Jesuit Chronicle

Wondering what to watch?: Your guide to the best shows to watch during quarantine

A brief guide to some of the best TV to watch during social distancing.

Wondering what to watch?: Your guide to the best shows to watch during quarantine
Picture this: School has just been cancelled for over a month, and you’re feeling lost on what to do. You are sitting at home, staring at a family picture you think you look bad in, so bored that you’re thinking about what would happen if you decided to jump start the Purge. Suddenly, you remember the overabundance of streaming services your family has, and you rush to the TV and grab the remote. Then you freeze. You think, “do I check out an old Disney Channel show on Disney+? Do I try to watch Breaking Bad to seem nuanced on Netflix? Do I finally start Handmaid’s Tale on Hulu because everyone tells me it’s amazing and I know I have to watch it but I feel a little behind because I never read the original book so will I even understand it?” Eventually you shut off the TV and decide to take your fourth nap of the day.
The streaming service world is a hard, unforgiving world. If you are anything like me, the overwhelming amount of content on all streaming services, especially multiple streaming services, leaves me feeling tired just from 5 minutes of scrolling. TV shows are especially hard, because it’s not only a commitment but there are Just. So. Many.
So, I’ve decided to compile a list of the best TV shows to watch on the big 4 of streaming services so you can finally have some peace of mind. And because you need a new commitment. I know it’s scary, but it’s time. You got this.


I Am Not Okay With This: A show about some teens and some superpowers and some crazy situations. It’ll surprise you and confuse you all at the same time. But it’s great! It also has very short, easy-to-digest episodes for you Tik Tok users out there who can barely pay attention to any video longer than 20 seconds. Go crazy! Hey, it even has the kids from It!

Schitt’s Creek: If Eugene Levy’s eyebrows aren’t enough to draw you into this show, it’s witty writing and hilarious cast will. Focusing on an uber-rich family who loses their house and wealth and goes to live in a motel they bought, the comedy is all of the ridiculous fun you’d expect. Also, it’s Canadian. And everyone loves Canada! Just wait until you hear them say “sorry”.

Russian Doll: I have nothing to say except that this is the best show on Netflix, period. And it’s much better if you don’t know the plot. Do yourself a favor and watch it.

The Circle: Like reality TV? Like to hate on random people you don’t know in real life? Want to see a Black Mirror episode without the scary stuff? This is the show for you. Watch a bunch of really beautiful people try to win a popularity contest and try and figure out how they aren’t getting bored living by themselves.

Star Trek: Because you deserve it. I don’t care who you are, but the classic Star Trek show is the most relaxing thing you can watch. It’s so great. The very definition of an oldie but a goodie.

 

Mr. Robot: You know, the one with the guy who looks like he needs to catch up on sleep? Spoiler alert: he does. If you like hacking and intense camera angles, this is the show for you. It’s smart and quick and will make you wish you were better with tech. It had plenty of twists and turns to keep you awake even through the parts when they are just talking about IT. I don’t get it either, trust me.

Fleabag: Remember that show that kept winning all of those Emmy’s? Turns out, it is just as good as everyone says! Phoebe Waller-Bridge is just her comedic genius self, and her character wanders through London trying to figure out what to do with her life while a bunch of random people keep popping up. The show is both funny and slightly depressing. It’s perfect! Also, you’ll wonder why no one has names and wish you could give them some.

Hunters: This one’s weird. But if you miss Logan Lerman as much as I, get on it. A bunch of people decide to hunt down a bunch of Nazis living out in New York. It’s a lot, I agree, but dang if it isn’t entertaining. It’s also based on a true story, which makes even weirder and crazier. Check it out.

Modern Love: For all you romantic people out there, this one’s it. It’s an anthology series about people falling in love. It’s pretty feel-good and will make you feel extremely single. But that’s okay. The right person will come along eventually. In the meantime, if you want to cry over fictional character’s relationships, watch this show.


 

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: Need I even say anything? This is one of the few shows that you can hit a random episode of and not be confused or frustrated because you didn’t watch any of the previous ones. If you are thinking of committing a crime out of boredom, this show will talk you out of it. It’s gross, it gets pretty sad, but you’ll keep watching it anyway, because you’re weird like that.

Community: Wondering how to fill that hole in your heart when The Office is removed from Netflix? This is the show for you. Centering around a group of community college goers, it’s one of the funniest and sweetest shows out there, with one of the best casts in a sitcom to date! It’s just so good!! Can you tell I’m biased?! Also if you want to see a young(er) Donald Glover… ahh, what am I talking about, of course you do!

Wu-Tang: An American Saga: For rap and history fans, this show portrays the lives and rise to fame of the members of the Wu-Tang Clan. It’s such good TV. Even if you don’t know anything about the Wu-Tang, do yourself a favor and learn. Bring Da Ruckus!

Looking for Alaska: Remember that book you read in 7th grade that you thought you were super cool for having? Well, it’s a show now! And even though it’s just as corny as you remember the book being, it’s also a heartfelt nostalgia trip back to the early 2000s. It’ll make you giggle, it’ll make you cry, it’ll make you say “wow, I thought John really did something when I was 12.”

Atlanta: Yes, this is the second time Donald Glover has appeared on this list and I ain’t sorry. Atlanta is about, well Atlanta. It’s one of those shows that’s so wacky that I can’t really explain it. It’s one of the most well-made, clever shows out there though, so do yourself and favor and give it a shot. And stay woke!


Suite Life of Zack and Cody: The best show Disney ever put out. And that’s on 2000s haircuts! No, you definitely aren’t too old to watch it. There’s nothing that puts a smile on your face like Suite Life. It’s perfect. I have no critiques. It’s what every show after it strives to be like.

Wizards of Waverly Place: It’s just as good as you remember! The outfits are just as wacky as you thought! You’ll still wish you were a wizard! Selena Gomez is a queen! There’s nothing to not love about this show. The intro song is straight up everything. If there’s any show to revisit it’s this.

Hannah Montana: If you don’t want to see Miley Cyrus in her tangled wig, you are lying. The show holds up. It’s fun, it’s a great time passer, and it’s the really good kind of nostalgia. And Every. Song. Slaps.

High School Musical: The Musical (The Series): It’s so cute. If you are a die-hard HSM fan, you’ll love it. Featuring Teens Singing At Inappropriate Times, Teens Having Beef With Eachother, Teens Who Definitely Shouldn’t Be Dancing In This Situation. It’s a fun time, even if it isn’t the original.

The Mandalorian: Whether or not you understand or appreciate Star Wars… it has Baby Yoda in it. And it may be an old meme, but he never gets less cute. It’s worth it for him. Do it for Baby Yoda.

About the Writer
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Jayla Lowery, Staff Writer

Jayla Lowery is a current senior at Jesuit High School. She enjoys biking, reading, swimming, music, daydreaming, watching movies, and writing mediocre...

Eternal Atake by Lil Uzi Vert- Review

Eternal Atake by Lil Uzi Vert Album Cover. Album released March 6th 2020.

Lil Uzi Vert

Eternal Atake by Lil Uzi Vert Album Cover. Album released March 6th 2020.

Eternal Atake Lil Uzi Vert’s new album released on March 13 2020 after two years of his fans longing for this album. During those years Uzi got into a feud with rapper Rich the Kid and even almost retired saying “I wanna take the time out to say I thank each and every one of supporters but I’m done with music I deleted everything I wanna be normal … I wanna wake up in 2013” on his Instagram story. Needless to say fans were really excited when this album was released.  This is Uzi’s second studio album, his first being Love is Rage 2 released in 2017.

 

The album starts out with the song “Baby Pluto” which is Uzi’s alter ego rap name. The song mostly is Uzi bragging about the luxuries and cars he has.  In the first part of the album Uzi shows off his hard hitting and more trappy style of music with songs like “Baby Pluto”, “Silly Watch” and “Pop”, in these songs Uzi does not sing a lot and relies on rap more. 

 

The album then takes a sharp turn and Uzi starts showing off his melodie skills in songs like “I’m Sorry” and “Bigger Than Life”. These songs remind me of one of Uzi’s old songs “The Way Life Goes” on Love is Rage 2. These songs are all pretty dark songs where he talks about breakups. 

 

We also see Uzi show his happy side that is surprising to see from him in songs like “Homecoming” and “Celebration Station”. In these songs he talks about dancing, money, partying  and overall just having a fun time.  

 

One of the next songs of the album “Chrome Heart Tags” another rapper Chief Keef Produced the beat.  This is the first ever beat produced by Chief Keef to be put in a major label album release. This is not the first time Uzi Has rapped on one of Chief Keef’s beats though, he was featured on a song called “Cap Flow” by DooWop. 

 

Next in the album is Uzi only track with another artist, “Urgency” featuring Syd. Syd is a woman singer who was previously in the popular band Odd Future.  In the song Uzi shows off his singing ability and rapping ability. Syd and Uzi collaborate really well together and make the song sound smooth.

 

Later in the album the song “P2” appears, any fan of Uzi immediately knew this was a sequel to “XO TOUR Llif3” Uzi’s top song on his last album. The songs sound so similar and use some of the same lyrics. Both of the songs are produced by the same producer TM88.  

Eternal Atake Lil Uzi Vert’s new album released on March 13 2020 after two years of his fans longing for this album. During those years Uzi got into a feud with rapper Rich the Kid and even almost retired saying “I wanna take the time out to say I thank each and every one of supporters but I’m done with music I deleted everything I wanna be normal … I wanna wake up in 2013” on his Instagram story. Needless to say fans were really excited when this album was released.  This is Uzi’s second studio album, his first being Love is Rage 2 released in 2017.

 

The album starts out with the song “Baby Pluto” which is Uzi’s alter ego rap name. The song mostly is Uzi bragging about the luxuries and cars he has.  In the first part of the album Uzi shows off his hard hitting and more trappy style of music with songs like “Baby Pluto”, “Silly Watch” and “Pop”, in these songs Uzi does not sing a lot and relies on rap more. 

 

The album then takes a sharp turn and Uzi starts showing off his melodie skills in songs like “I’m Sorry” and “Bigger Than Life”. These songs remind me of one of Uzi’s old songs “The Way Life Goes” on Love is Rage 2. These songs are all pretty dark songs where he talks about breakups. 

 

We also see Uzi show his happy side that is surprising to see from him in songs like “Homecoming” and “Celebration Station”. In these songs he talks about dancing, money, partying  and overall just having a fun time.  

 

One of the next songs of the album “Chrome Heart Tags” another rapper Chief Keef Produced the beat.  This is the first ever beat produced by Chief Keef to be put in a major label album release. This is not the first time Uzi Has rapped on one of Chief Keef’s beats though, he was featured on a song called “Cap Flow” by DooWop. 

 

Next in the album is Uzi only track with another artist, “Urgency” featuring Syd. Syd is a woman singer who was previously in the popular band Odd Future.  In the song Uzi shows off his singing ability and rapping ability. Syd and Uzi collaborate really well together and make the song sound smooth.

 

Later in the album the song “P2” appears, any fan of Uzi immediately knew this was a sequel to “XO TOUR Llif3” Uzi’s top song on his last album. The songs sound so similar and use some of the same lyrics. Both of the songs are produced by the same producer TM88.  At the end of the album there are two already released singles or Bonus tracks “Futsal Shuffle 2020” and “That Way”. “Futsal Shuffle 2020” was released in 2019 and has a very electric feel to it and many people think that the beat sounds like the old mobile game Geometry Dash.  “That Way” was released in 2020 and includes A chant from “I Want It That Way” By the Backstreet Boys.

 

This album is overall everything I wanted from Uzi and more. Even though he kept on dragging on his fans for two years he delivered and put out a great long album. 

At the end of the album there are two already released singles or Bonus tracks “Futsal Shuffle 2020” and “That Way”. “Futsal Shuffle 2020” was released in 2019 and has a very electric feel to it and many people think that the beat sounds like the old mobile game Geometry Dash.  “That Way” was released in 2020 and includes A chant from “I Want It That Way” By the Backstreet Boys.

 

This album is overall everything I wanted from Uzi and more. Even though he kept on dragging on his fans for two years he delivered and put out a great long album. 

About the Writer
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JJ Gray, Staff Writer







JJ Gray is a sophomore and first time journalism student, he is excited to be in the class and have a great time. In JJ’s free time he reads...

April Artist of the Month

April+Artist+of+the+Month

April Artist of the Month:

Miyako Barnett

Sophomore Aleena Barnett can still remember drawing with her sister, junior Miyako Barnett, when they were seven-year-olds: “We had a whole series of frogs that we drew together. I often pull out old drawings to make fun of with her.”

Miyako, a current member of the Art III class, says her first memory of creating art was of painting on rocks.

“It was a fun little activity we used to do when I was younger. Both of my parents are pretty artistic, and my grandpa was really into art, so they wanted us to know how to creatively express ourselves.”

Miyako’s parents also taught she and Aleena how to draw simple illustrations, such as people and flowers.

This practice of drawing people led to Miyako’s fascination with the human body.

“A lot of times, the people I paint are naked; I just feel like the human body is really beautiful. I paint androgynous people because I feel like it shouldn’t matter what someone’s gender is.”

Miyako’s art training in middle school came to a halt when her school ceased to provide an art class, yet the artist was determined to continue learning.

“There weren’t many art classes in middle school, so I mostly just watched YouTube videos, and [read] books [about art],” says Miyako. Outside of school, Miyako finds time to work on projects big and small, using her favorite media, acrylic paint and pencil.

Says Miyako, “[I work on art during] the weekend, and long breaks, like winter break or summer break, because during the school year I don’t have time outside of art class.”

Miyako has also been commissioned to do art projects for her community, from submitting her artwork to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, where she won a “gold key” for her acrylic rendition of the rapper Nipsey Hussle, to painting portraits of family members for their birthdays. 

Right now, Miyako is experimenting with clay in her Art III class, where teacher Sascha Manning shows her students how to sculpt, glaze, and fire.

“At first, I didn’t really have an idea of what I was going to do, so I just started building with clay randomly. I really didn’t like it because it was my first time [using] clay, but I like clay [now] because it’s so hands-on.”

Manning took notice of Miyako’s quiet but inspiring attitude.

“All art reflects the creator that made it. For Miyako, she’s a lovely person. She has the ability to show her strength and voice through her drawings and paintings. When I first met her, I saw a student whose art was needed by the world.”

Aleena, who is also an artist, describes her sister as inspiring, passionate, and confident.

“When I was younger I thought that [Miyako] was better than me, so I always tried to get to her level. She has always been a supportive sister, [telling] me that my art is just as good [as hers]. It’s comforting to know someone you look up to so much believes in your passion, too.”

Aleena says that although she and her sister do not draw together very much anymore, as Aleena puts it, “I like to go in her room and draw while she does whatever she wants to do.”

Does Miyako see a future in art?

“I might minor in it, but realistically, I don’t know if I could make money off of it. My style of art isn’t something people really buy.” says Miyako. “If I were to do a career in art, [I] would probably be [an art therapist].”

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NIPSEY HUSSLE PORTRAIT

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LOW-HANGING FRUIT

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THE GRIND

About the Writer
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Steele Clevenger, Staff Writer and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Charismatic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A junior at Jesuit High School, Steele loves to...

Miss Anthropocene by Grimes – Review

The+album+art+to+Grimes%27+first+studio+since+2015+album%2C+Miss+Anthropocene

4AD

The album art to Grimes' first studio since 2015 album, Miss Anthropocene

In February of this year, Canadian artist Grimes released her fifth studio album, Miss Anthropocene, her first release since her 2015 album Art Angels. Her latest release features heavy, electronic sounds and dark, morbid lyrics and imagery to criticize the way people have abandoned their values in favor of technology.

The album opens with the track “So Heavy I Fell Through the Earth”, immediately hitting the audience with light, breathy vocals, and heavy, electronic production. The lyrics describe the speaker held down by her love for someone, and the slower, heavy beat builds that feeling well in the listener. This song evokes a similar experience to something by Tame Impala, but with more aggressive instrumentation.

The next track “Darkseid” bears much heavier lyrics, as the speaker talks about how the ghost of someone they lost haunts them, even though they have nothing more to offer. The extremely heavy instrumentals add to the feeling of discomfort and fear described in the lyrics, accompanying them well. The song presents a dark look at death as the speaker rejects people’s attempts to comfort them, attempting to create more similarities than differences between the living and the dead.

In a shift from the darkness of the first two songs, the third track, “Delete Forever”, moves to a dreamier sound, with more upbeat music and vocals, even though the lyrics do not shift much upwards. The speaker discusses how they feel lost and empty after trying to recover from losing someone. The references to technology throughout the album begin to take a clearer shape in this song, as the speaker starts to criticize the way society handles death today, an idea they fill out later in the album.

Violence, the fourth track, continues the upbeat tempo, presenting something resembling a dance beat, keeping with the darker lyrics. The song presents an abusive relationship, and while the situation is straightforward, paring it alongside the strong themes about technology allows for many less straightforward interpretations. Many people see this song as a metaphor for the relationship between humans and the Earth, though the song can be related to many people and situations.

The next song, “4ÆM”, blends happier beats with heavier, electronic ones, moving between seamlessly. The lyrics reference falling down, calling back to the first song, and building the idea that when the speaker is vulnerable they are more susceptible to falling into traps of past relationships.

In a thematic shift from the past couple of songs, “New Gods” takes shots at the way people have abandoned traditional values in favor of turning to technology and fame. The speaker seems to directly address God, telling him that they are going to let go of him, as he cannot give them what they want. The airy, soft vocals and productions create a somber, almost ambient sound, making the lyrics more reflective than aggressive like some of the other songs.
“My Name is Dark” quickly shifts back to the earlier sound with hard production and some of the harshest lyrics on the album. The song basically embodies chaos, as the speaker threatens to turn to drugs and violence as a response to their anger. The song possesses a clearer call to action, more obviously pointing out the failure of society to properly help people in need, allowing them to turn to less productive, more dangerous ways of coping with problems.

Continuing the themes from “My Name is Dark”, “You’ll miss me when I’m not around” presents easily the darkest lyrics on the album, presenting a clearly suicidal speaker, criticizing the way society fails to care for people before they die, only becoming aware of any problems after a person is already gone. This song was likely inspired by the recent string of celebrity deaths, particularly in the music industry, caused by drugs, suicide, and other problems. The song has more standard vocals and production, again calling more attention to the lyrics. The song carries the powerful message that we need to care for people before the problems become too strong, not wait until after and reminisce on how we could have done better. This song is easily the most poignant, heavy song on the album, carrying an incredible amount of emotional weight on it.

Keeping with the heavier reflection on death, “Before the fever” focuses on the experience of someone as they die. The song begins with a somber, reluctant tone, slowly moving onto acceptance. The song has compressed vocals, but deeper, not high pitched like most of the rest of the album, and features heavy drums and baselines, aiding the depressing, slow tone the song takes.

The penultimate song on the album, “IDORU”, takes a more upbeat tone, presenting an almost classic love song. The song’s lyrics and production are quite straightforward, without any complex or abstruse imagery, which builds a certain charm into the song. Coming from the darkness of the past few tracks, this song creates a nice change of pace before the finale, and the simplicity makes it easy to understand and get behind.

“We Appreciate Power” finishes the track going back to the heavy sound of the start of the album one last time, concluding album and presenting its ultimate idea. The speaker abandons God, ultimately abandoning past values, in favor of technology, makeup, AI, and modern technology. The song criticizes the way that people treat social media and project their life onto the internet as dangerous and not truly living. Super aggressive, metallic and electronic sounds color the song, conveying the speaker’s transition from traditional human values to worshipping technology.

Miss Anthropocene combines unique and well-crafted sounds with brilliant lyrics that shift between deep symbolism and metaphors to more straightforward lines to convey an experience that criticize problems in modern culture and how we deal with them. Grimes’ new album is easily one of the best of the year so far and every track on it is intentional, well-made, and interesting to think about.

About the Writer
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James Martini, Staff Writer

James Martini’s interest in writing began as early as the second grade, and he has written ever since. As a senior, he began his career at the Jesuit...

“A Musical” hits the stage

Jesuit’s spring drama production features the newly released musical “Something Rotten”, a comedic and historical story made contemporary. 

Elaine Kloser
Jesuit students in the Spring musical "Something Rotten" rehearsing a scene.

Set in the late 16th century, “Something Rotten” follows the storyline of two brothers, Nick and Nigel Bottom. 

They write plays together, but have trouble getting themselves off the ground due to their fierce competition, Shakespeare. Their minds troubled, the Bottom brothers seek help from a fortune teller, who tells them that musicals will be popular, but 500 years in the future. 

Because musicals are ahead of their time, Nick and Nigel’s musical doesn’t gain much traction. Returning to the soothsayer, they ask what Shakespeare’s greatest play will be. The fortune teller, who isn’t that accurate, tells the brothers that it will be ‘Omelet,’ instead of ‘Hamlet’.

Nick and Nigel then desperately try to create ‘Omelet’ the musical, not knowing that Shakespeare would actually create ‘Hamlet’.

Drama directors Elaine Kloser and Jeff Hall chose “Something Rotten” as the winter musical due to its seamless weaving together of the historical timeline of the 1500s and pops of comedy. 

“The history of musical theater is charted throughout [the musical],” Kloser said. “But at the same time, it’s very irreverent and fun with all that stuff,” Hall added.  

While working with her students, Kloser notices a special relation between them and the storyline. 

“For theater people it really tells a story, and we love that for the students who are involved. They can really find things in it that are personal to them and their theater experience.”

Junior Nathan Hasbrook, who plays Nick Bottom, describes one of the hardest parts of the musical, learning the dances.  

“The hardest part for me is definitely the dancing, because I’ve never really done tap dancing before this year. [I’ve] kind of grown into it, but it’s a challenge,” Hasbrook said. 

Senior Danna Awad, cast as Portia, an art-loving Puritan, explains her time commitment to the musical. They rehearse six times a week for about three hours a day, and as the weeks draw closer to opening night, those rehearsals turn into six to eight hours. 

“The hardest part is definitely the time commitment, but it’s really fun because you can be around the same people and get really close to them,” Awad stated. 

Kloser and Hall also utilize new technology while constructing the backdrops. Because Something Rotten is set in around ten different locations, the use of a projector benefits them greatly. A company down in California reached out to Jesuit a couple of months ago to build customized projections for this musical, and Kloser and Hall are excited to work with them. 

About the Contributor
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Rosa Madden, Staff Writer







Rosa Madden, a junior at Jesuit High School, is taking her first year of journalism this year. She’s excited to write articles for the paper...

March Artists of the Month

March+Artists+of+the+Month

March Artists of the Month

By Steele Clevenger, Staff Writer and Art Director


“They inspire me because they are so inspired. There’s so much joy and love and honest inspiration that it’s contagious.”

-Art Teacher Sascha Manning

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From left: Charlie Wallace, Ben Morich, Caz Barnum, Kevin Wisnewski, and Kyle Kneefel

When the talent abounds in your art class, how is a teacher to pick ONE artist of the month? Art IV teacher Sascha Manning has a solution: pick five.

Seniors Ben Morich, Kevin Wisnewski, Kyle Kneefel, Caz Barnum, and Charlie Wallace, who met in Manning’s Art I class freshman year, are all recipients of the title “March Artist of the Month.”

Casual and humorous, these five young men laughed while describing their favorite media.Said Morich: “Paint, acrylic.” Wisnewski echoed Morich’s enthusiasm. “I like pen a lot,” said Kneefel. “I do oil paint,” said Barnum. Wallace answered simply: “Spray  paint.”

Each artist finds inspiration in nature as well as their surroundings.

I find inspiration all around me, really. I find it in other people, and I find it in other people’s works because I’m always really impressed by [them],” said Kneefel.

So, how did their art careers begin? Barnum said, “I got started in art in middle school. I was doing little doodles and people would say ‘Oh, those are really good’.”

Wallace, Wisnewski, Kneefel, and Morich agreed that their stories were similar to Barnum’s. All took an interest in art during middle school, and eventually showed their art to Manning for a chance to enter Art I.

Years later, each artist still finds comfort in art, even during their hectic and stressful senior year. Outside of class, these talented young men find time to work on art projects on which they are passionate.

Wisnewski said, “Outside of class, I like to paint [on] shoes for people. I’ve been selling painted shoes since freshman year.”

Added Barnum: “It’s very hard for me to find time outside of school [to do art] because I’m doing a lot of stuff, but on big breaks I do art.”

Then, Manning chimed in with a question: “Did you ever have the sense that art is just for girls, or that you have to be a comic artist to fit in to the stereotype [that all male artists are graphic novelists.]?” to which the boys nodded.“

For me, there’s always been outside influences that say, ‘Your art has to be this way,’ and for a while I thought that way,” said Kneefel. “But as soon as I got into eighth grade and high school, it was like, ‘It’s my artwork. I can do whatever I want to do.’” 

The energy that these artists generate is contagious. Each brings life and vibrancy to their work.“They inspire me because they are so inspired,” said Manning. “There’s so much joy and love and honest inspiration that it’s contagious.

When asked how they would describe each other, Wallace said, “Kevin and Ben and Kyle and Caz are crazy.” Kneefel called Wallace a “hype beast.”

When asked if they had any stories they wanted to tell, Manning immediately said, “How about the great flood freshman year?”

There were audible groans from Kneefel (“Ugh, that was my best project!”) and exclamations of “Oh yeah!” from Wallace, Wisnewski, Barnum, and Morich.“

Because we had so much snow, and the [Performing Arts Center] roof is flat, we had a flood in here to where there was a good amount of water on the floor,” said Manning. “[The class] had already invested a good four weeks into their artwork, and the great flood took down the majority of their [acrylic paintings].”

This flood, which seems to have brought the artists together the way only a natural disaster can is something the artists and Manning will remember forever.

Do these artists see a future in art? The answer for all of them is yes.

Well, almost all of them.

Barnum seems to have a different agenda than the other artists.“I’ll still do art, but …” Barnum said. Manning then chimed in: “You know you want to be a history teacher,” she said. 

“Mr. Barnum,” said Wallace, at which all the boys laughed.

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BY KEVIN WISNEWSKI

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BY CAZ BARNUM

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BY CHARLIE WALLACE

Kevin Wisnewski creates both acrylic (left) and digital art.

Caz Barnum is fascinated by oil painted landscapes, which are inspired by famous artist Bob Ross.

Charlie Wallace’s favorite medium is spray paint.

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Staff Writer and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Charismatic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A junior at Jesuit High School, Steele loves to...

The Slow Rush by Tame Impala (Review)

Tame Impala's musical creativity disappoints in the best way.

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Universal Music Australia

The album cover for The Slow Rush by Tame Impala, as reviewed by Jayla Lowery.

The much anticipated follow-up project to 2015’s Currents, The Slow Rush is Kevin Parker’s 4th studio under the musical persona Tame Impala. Greg Calbi, Steve Fallone, and Glen Goetze joined Parker on mixing and producing, and the album was released February 14th, 2020.

Showcasing Tame Impala’s ability for both new-wave sounds and post-modern funk, The Slow Rush shows off what we already know about Parker’s musical style: he’s inventive and he’s different, but also a tad predictable.

On The Slow Rush, Parker’s signature style turns out to be his own worst enemy. There’s only so much postmodernism to be had before boredom and predictability begins to occur; and the unfortunate reality of Parker’s expertise on unique psychedelic sounds means the excitement of the album’s genre-bending tunes fade after the first few tracks. The songs on the new album disappointingly sound all too similar to those on Currents, and the project’s production doesn’t add anything to what we already know about Parker’s musical range.

But the album’s weakness is also its biggest strength. Tame Impala’s distinctive blend of rock, pop, electronic, and funk is the only one of its kind and continues to go musically where other similar artists do not. There’s a good reason Parker remains one of the most successful producers in the modern music industry, and The Slow Rush only confirms his talent for wonderfully anomalous sounds. Further, its pensive writing fits its title perfectly and buttresses Parker’s musical voice and talent for storytelling.

Highlights of the album include Breathe Deeper, which jolts the album back to life with its inclusion of drums and fun piano riffs, as well as the uptempo and exciting Lost in Yesterday. The single Borderline is back and better than ever, and it’s updated production revamps it to be even more slick and fun than when it first appeared.

The lows of the album occur in the beginning and towards end, where songs like One More Year and Instant Destiny bleed together far too much. The length of the song Posthumous Forgiveness doesn’t lend it any favors, especially when the second half of the song far exceeds the quality of the first. The albums last four songs drag on far too long, and their lengthiness and similar compositions make for a rather uninteresting end to the album.

So is The Slow Rush bad? No, not in the slightest. But the album’s unique sounds are all unique sounds we’ve heard Parker produce before. The foil of having such an exceptional album like Currents is that when the same thing happens again, it’s not as exciting. The Slow Rush keeps Parker’s inventive musical style alive while not giving us anything new to chew on. As solid and thoughtful as it is, it’s been done before. And unlike Currents, there’s not a single track Rihanna could cover with ease, and that in itself is the biggest disappointment.

About the Writer
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Jayla Lowery, Staff Writer

Jayla Lowery is a current senior at Jesuit High School. She enjoys biking, reading, swimming, music, daydreaming, watching movies, and writing mediocre...

Circles by Mac Miller (Review)

Circles' thoughtful lyrics and sweet melodies send Mac Miller off in a near-perfect way.

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"Circles" album cover of courtesy of Warner Records.

Following his 2018 death at age 26, Circles is Mac Miller’s final project in the music world to date. The album was in its early stages of post-production when Miller passed, and was finished by producer Jon Brion and released by Miller’s family.

Pop-rap with a touch of indie-soul, Circles is both dreary and uplifting, culminating into a gorgeous yet saddening posthumous release for the late Miller. From uptempo beats on songs like Complicated to the dismal lyricism of songs like Good News and Woods, Circles beautifully blends the trials and tribulations of Miller’s life with his unwavering optimism.

Good News appeared January 9th, setting the tone of the record with its sleepy production and weary yet earnest lyrics. Miller vocalizes his difficulty expressing his authentic feelings to his family and friends: “Good news, good news, good news/That’s all they want to hear/No, they don’t like it when I’m down”. But the song is also quietly optimistic, with Miller spending the last verse looking to the future with hope. The verse’s idealism makes for one of the most tragic moments of the album in the context of Miller’s untimely passing.

The album’s earlier tracks are the most similar to Miller’s more boppy songs on projects Swimming and The Divine Feminine, with lighthearted beats and fun melodies through songs Complicated and Blue World. A smoother track in the form of Hands bears resemblance to some of Miller’s slickest tracks from his last two LPs.

Miller’s cover of Everybody’s Gotta Live transforms 60’s rock band Love’s hit into a somber think piece, accompanied by some of Miller’s best singing in his discography. Another moment that displays Miller’s singing skill occurs on Hand Me Downs, where he is joined by Baro Sura on a bluesy record that showcases Miller’s knack for effective hooks and expert blending of both his rap and singing talents.

Combining the best sounds of his two most recent LP’s and some of the musician’s best writing to date, Circles is a thoughtful and loving gift from Miller and crew that is well worth everyone’s time. Miller not only left the world with his hardships through this album, but with his bright, dazzling hopes for his future. On Circles, Miller’s aim isn’t for listeners to focus on the melancholy feelings of the record; instead, he prompts them to retain the joy of knowing the future is brighter on the other side of suffering. It’s an accomplished project and a perfect final farewell for Mac Miller, securing his legacy as one of the brightest lights in the modern music world. “We can only go up,” he raps on Woods; and indeed, we can.

About the Writer
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Jayla Lowery, Staff Writer

Jayla Lowery is a current senior at Jesuit High School. She enjoys biking, reading, swimming, music, daydreaming, watching movies, and writing mediocre...

I Disagree by Poppy Review

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Artist Poppy in her iconic white studio used in her YouTube videos

Known for her bizarre, creepy music and YouTube videos, Poppy released her new album “I Disagree” this last month, her first album without her co-creator and collaborator Titanic Sinclair.

This album takes a sharp turn from her past work, featuring a strong amount of hardcore and metal instrumentals and much darker, nearly apocalyptic imagery. “I Disagree” undeniably features a much angrier version of Poppy’s character than previous music.

This album is also much more candid as well. Poppy’s character and music typically critiqued celebrities and celebrity culture, but “I Disagree” generally critiques one specific person: Poppy. The first and last few songs on the album feature very abstruse imagery, but the middle part of the album quite clearly depicts the artist’s negative perception of Poppy.

Songs like “Fill the Crown” and “Sit / Stay” attack Poppy’s producers, and possibly her former collaborator Titanic Sinclair, condemning their obsession with success and declaring that she won’t follow their will anymore.

Denouncing producers and fame by attacking her own team not only criticizes celebrity culture, but points out that Poppy’s character is no different from the other celebrities she criticizes. Poppy reveals that her producers tricked the people who followed her for her satire of fame in the same way she satirized.

“I Disagree” ultimately represents a much more candid depiction of the artist behind Poppy, creating a more personal experience for her and her listeners. The production and songs do an excellent job of building the sense and engaging the listener in Poppy’s anger.

While Poppy is no stranger to hard breakdowns and instrumentals, she has never made an album so overwhelmingly metal before. The production fits her anger on the album, but it is also very well done. Every track on the album features strong instrumental and vocal production, never holding back the artist’s ultimate intent and message.

Between the unique criticisms and lyrics presented on the album and the fresh metal sound, “I Disagree” represents the best of Poppy’s work, and is definitely, and perhaps surprisingly, well worth a listen.

About the Writer
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James Martini, Staff Writer

James Martini’s interest in writing began as early as the second grade, and he has written ever since. As a senior, he began his career at the Jesuit...

JACKBOYS by JACKBOYS Review

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Travis Scott, founder of Cactus Jack Records and member of JACKBOYS, a rap collective signed to his label

Travis Scott recently released his new EP JACKBOYS with the rap collective JACKBOYS, made up of multiple artists signed to Scott’s record label Cactus Jack Records.

The EP features a trap sound common to both modern rap and Scott’s personal sound, and the first song, “Highest in the Room” is largely a Travis Scott song, likely to get the listener on board with the EP as Scott’s name holds the most power among the contributing artists. The song itself also embodies the EP as well. The instrumental and vocal production are all good, but Scott’s verse clearly holds the most substance.

The next full song, “GANG GANG”, does not have as much going on, however. The production and rapping are all good again, but the song just does not have anything interesting enough to keep the listener’s attention. The production, while good, is too one-note and does not do enough to differentiate itself, and the vocals, again, are good but lack any real substance, largely due to its nature as a collective EP, not the EP of one specific artist.

The final two tracks of the EP, “WHAT TO DO?” and “GATTI”, feature the most dynamic and interesting tracks on the EP though. “WHAT TO DO?”, while a little long, had lyrics that pull the listener in with an interesting situation and story. Travis Scott’s name on this track further indicates that he carries the most weight lyrically on the EP.

The final song, “GATTI”, has by far the strongest beat and flow of the album. Pop Smoke’s opening verse flows naturally and creatively, making a much more interesting experience than the rest of the EP. The track is well placed as the musical peak of the EP.

Despite these good final tracks, the lack of anything really meaningful permeates most of the EP. Once the freshness of new music wears off, there are still several songs of simply more of the same. This is not a Travis Scott album, or any other artist’s album, so the EP obviously will not tell an overly personal story, but the album still leaves something to be desired.

About the Contributor
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James Martini, Staff Writer

James Martini’s interest in writing began as early as the second grade, and he has written ever since. As a senior, he began his career at the Jesuit...

December Artist of the Month: Alyssa Knudsen

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December Artist of the Month: Alyssa Knudsen

A story of art influenced by faith, feminism, and family

By Steele Clevenger


Senior Alyssa Knudsen, a member of the Art Four class, has always been fascinated by art, one of her favorite subjects in school.

“I remember when I was in kindergarten, we had an art class once or twice a week, and, as all kids did, [I drew] the sky at the top of the page and the sun in the corner. That was my first memory [of doing art].”

Inspired by the beauty of nature and the human body, Knudsen uses her artistry to evoke curiosity and fascination from viewers.

“The way that light dances and plays and reflects on the human body and on water means a lot to me because it represents the interconnectedness of my actions.”

Knudsen especially strives to emphasize female confidence in her work.

“One of the reasons I focus so much on the female body is to counteract my own perceptions of my body. I have struggled with body image before, so I want to create beauty in every single woman so that they realize even if they are not holding up to whatever standards they think they should be, there is grace and beauty in how they look.”

Knudsen’s faith, Judaism, is a driving force for her artistic decisions. Her most recent art project, an enormous self-portrait created using mainly acrylic paints, was the perfect way to further explore her religion.

“I have been using [this project] as an opportunity to explore my identity as an American Jewish woman. There is a lot of symbolism in the painting.”

“She’s part of our Art Four family,” said Art Four teacher Sascha Manning. “She has been a wonderful addition to the culture of this school.”

Manning says she is inspired by Knudsen’s ambition.“[Alyssa is] verbally articulate, and she strives to be visually articulate as well. She’s really selective in all of the choices she makes; she does not settle for mediocre.”

Knudsen’s younger sister, sophomore Hayley Knudsen, agreed with Manning when she said Alyssa was a hard worker. 

“She’s always going after what she wants, and she’s such a hard worker, especially when it comes to school. I strive to be like her [because] she is such a good role model.”

Hayley recalls that though they had the usual sibling tensions when they were younger, she and her sister now have an unbreakable bond.“

When [Alyssa] turned 16, she really wanted to take me out driving, just the two of us, with no parent in the car. I just remember how excited she was to just have me in the car with her and spend some quality sister time [together],” said Hayley. “[She is] my best friend.”

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“Knudsen especially strives to emphasize female confidence in her work.”

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About the Writer
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Steele Clevenger, Staff Writer and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Charismatic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A junior at Jesuit High School, Steele loves to...

Pride and Prejudice

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Jesuit Drama’s modern re-imagining of Pride and Prejudice


Written by Jayla Lowery

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Jesuit Drama’s first show this year is Pride and Prejudice, set to open on November 7th. This is the first time the program has performed the show.

The play centers around a young woman named Elizabeth and her endeavors with love, status, and morality, as well as her relationships with family and her love interest, Mr. Darcy. 

The production features senior Eoin McDounagh and junior Mackenzie Jaimes in the lead roles with drama teacher Elaine Kloser directing. 

Playwright Janet Munsil’s adaptation of the story caught the eye of Kloser, who had been searching for an engaging adaptation of Jane Austen’s novel for years. The script had been performed as an off-Broadway play in 2016.

“I think Pride and Prejudice purists are going to appreciate the show because the storyline is there, but it is adapted in such a way that it moves and feels contemporary,” Kloser said.

Jesuit’s reimagining of the show will feature a minimal set, one that cast members and Kloser find unique about their production.

“The set is different than other renditions,” Eoin McDounagh said, who is playing Mr. Darcy. 

“We’re using a pretty minimal set without a lot of props and pieces, which is a different spin than what others might have seen.” 

McDounagh and his fellow lead, Mackenzie Jaimes, have both enjoyed their time crafting the show. Jaimes is playing the protagonist of the story, Elizabeth Bennet.

“Rehearsals are fun, as well as getting to know what kinds of things they did in that era,” Jaimes said.

“Seeing everything come together with the costumes and the sets will be so exciting.” 

Immersing themselves and learning about the time period of the book has been an important part of the process for the cast and crew. Pride and Prejudice was written and takes place the early 1800s.

The production is set to have a rehearsal at an antique home in Portland next week.

“We’ve gotten to do a bit of studying up on how to age a person and how to carry themselves differently,” said Kloser.

“To get someone who’s wearing tennis shoes to carry themselves across the room as if they’re wearing a gown or slippers… it’s a lot different than what we’re used to in contemporary society.” 

Kloser and the cast are also excited to bring the history and context of the early 1800s out on stage for their audiences. The time period’s ideas on love, marriage, and gender are expected to be new for some audience members. 

“We get an opportunity to educate the audience on the 1800s and what life was like, especially for females. They didn’t have a lot of rights, and they didn’t have a lot of education, and they often had to marry who they were told to,” said Kloser.

“I do like this story because Jane Austen was ahead of her time, and making a statement on how women need to control their own destinies.”

Despite the show’s tweaked adaptation of the classic book, many Jane Austen fans are excited to see the school perform the show.

“This is going to be perfect for Jesuit drama. Because it’s an adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, I think it’ll be a lot more comedic and modern and fast-paced, and it’s going to be a lot of fun.” Senior Helen Ratcliff, who grew up watching the 1995 BBC adaptation of the novel, said.

The cast and crew are looking forward to opening night and are excited for people to experience the show.

“We’ll be really focusing on the power of the story and what it’s trying to say,” Kloser said.

“I’m excited for an audience to see the hard work these students have done.”

Pride and Prejudice will open on November 7th and will run until November 10th.

About the Writer
Photo of Jayla Lowery
Jayla Lowery, Staff Writer

Jayla Lowery is a current senior at Jesuit High School. She enjoys biking, reading, swimming, music, daydreaming, watching movies, and writing mediocre...

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