Jesuit Chronicle

Stella Bonta is December’s Artist of the Month

Stella+Bonta+is+December%E2%80%99s+Artist+of+the+Month.

Stella Bonta

Stella Bonta is December’s Artist of the Month.

When she was four, freshman Stella Bonta remembers drawing images of her family, the sun in the top left corner of the page, and grass across the bottom. 

 

“Whenever [my sister and I] would draw the grass, we have this texture on the walls in our house. I remember we would hold the paper up to the wall, and like, color, so it had texture,” Bonta said.

 

At the age of six, Bonta recalls a time when she was frustrated at a drawing, foreshadowing her future as an artist and self-proclaimed perfectionist.

 

“I was drawing at the kitchen table because I actually had free time when I was six. I was trying to draw something that did not look like a stick figure, something with arms with actual thickness. I remember trying so hard, and I just got so frustrated, and went back to drawing stick figures with three fingers and like the triangle body.

 

In elementary school, Bonta did not have a regular art class. Once a year, however, an art teacher would visit her class and give a lesson. In middle school, Bonta began to have a regular art class, although she said she had a difficult time relating to the type of art that was taught in the class. 

 

“It was cool, but my main teacher for art has really just been YouTube,” Bonta said. 

 

When it came to auditioning for the Jesuit Art Program, Bonta submitted her work to a Padlet, where it was reviewed by art teachers Sascha Manning and Danielle Chi. 

 

“She has a really good sense of color composition, all of those fundamentals that are needed for the advanced class,” Manning said. “Her work has a lot of expression in it, and she has very strong skills in drawing faces and hands.”

Manning also admires how hard Bonta works and how much time and effort she spends on her art. She described her as “expressive,” “friendly,” and “enthusiastic.”

 

“Stella is a very friendly person in every breakout room that she is in. She gets everyone interacting. People find her very approachable. She also very thoughtful and her enthusiasm really comes through very easily,” Manning said

 

Bonta says she has two separate art styles: one very realistic for portraits, the other for character sketches and “draw-this-in-your-style” challenges on Instagram. 

 

“The proportions are bigger and everything’s a bit more exaggerated —it’s semi-realistic,” Bonta said. 

 

Bonta’s favorite medium right now is watercolor because it is “unpredictable.” She says she could not use watercolor until she bought a travel set, and realized she was using way too much water. Now, watercolor is an integral part of her artwork. 

 

Right now in her Art I Advanced Class, Bonta is working on an art project pertaining to environmental justice and climate change. 

 

“The idea is to have Mother Nature in the center being suffocated by the human race, an image of suffering, Bonta said. 

 

Aside from practicing her art at Jesuit and posting her work on Instagram, Bonta has her own YouTube Channel for her art, which she started in eighth grade. She said the most challenging part of having a YouTube Channel, and being an artist in general, is “art block,” and having difficulty being creative. Despite this challenge Bonta continues to work on her art.

 

I feel like since COVID, art is a huge part of my life now,” Bonta said. I cannot go a day without drawing something. Art has totally shifted roles in my life. It is now my main creative outlet.”

 

Fellow Art I Advanced freshman Emma Williams described Bonta as funny and kind, even though she has only met her through Zoom this year!

 

“I met [Stella] through our second art class when we were in a break out room together,” Williams said. “She has amazing [art] technique and I love how nice she is to everyone. She also has a great sense of humor.“

 

When asked what advice she would give to beginner artists, Bonta said that patience and persistence are important to putting out one’s best work.

 

There’s always more to learn,” Bonta said. “There’s always something I can improve on, study, or practice. Get out of the mindset of “it’s good enough.” Be patient, don’t try to finish as fast as you can.”

 

Does Bonta see art in her future?

 

“I want art to have a significant role in what I’d do in the future,” Bonta said. “I would love to have a career in art, but I could also do it on the side because I also love linguistics.”

 

This piece was done in colored pencil by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
This piece was done in pencil by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
This piece was done in colored pencil by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
A digital piece by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
A digital piece by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Crusader Comics: A Covid Christmas

Crusader+Comics%3A+A+Covid+Christmas

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Live Theater During the Pandemic: Jesuit Presents Godspell!

Principal members of the Godspell cast pose for a group photo after their closing night.

James Miller

Principal members of the Godspell cast pose for a group photo after their closing night.

It’s not easy producing live theater in the age of social distancing, but drama directors Jeff Hall and Elaine Kloser have been working hard with students to put on a production of “Godspell” in a new digital format. 

The show was made up of a cast of about 34 actors, ten students performed live onstage and the rest performed on the screen through a variety of projections and special effects. In this new format, new opportunities, as well challenges presented themselves.

“It’s been really fun to get creative in a way that we haven’t before when [trying] to figure out how we can create a show and bring a larger group of people together in a time when we can’t all be in person,” said junior Ava Maloco. “I think it’s pretty exciting when everything is a little up in the air and you’re not sure exactly how things are going to turn out.” 

Behind the scenes was a tech crew of 40 students who had been working tirelessly to ensure a smooth run.

“The tech crew has been preparing for Godspell by setting up not only what we normally use for a show, like lights, microphones, but we’ve also been creating a huge amount of video projections featuring the ensembles, in addition to all the equipment needed to stream Godspell to everyone watching from home,” said senior tech crew member Luke Motschenbacher. “During the actual performances, the tech crew will be running lights, projections, microphones and sound effects, the cameras, and much more.”

The show follows a bit of an unconventional plot line, illustrating the story of Jesus’ life through parables, songs, and dancing. The message of the show, however, is really up to your own interpretation.

The show basically follows Jesus’s life, but I’d say that in a more abstract way the show is just about teaching valuable lessons, especially about community, in a more entertaining way,” said Ava Maloco. 

Many of the virtual ensemble and principal cast members agree that Godspell is centered around a common theme of community.

It’s pretty difficult to really understand what Godspell is about. I know many people think it’s a huge Christian and religious show, but I disagree,” said junior James Miller, who played Jesus. “Godspell tells a very simple but important story: a group of strangers being united through song, celebration, and, most importantly love.”

The show premiered on Friday, Dec. 4, with two more performances that followed Saturday and Sunday. Over 900 viewers streamed the show online, as well as a small live audience of family members who were able to watch the show live. 

“I think livestreaming the show really opened more doors than it closed,” said junior Kate Goddard. “My grandparents live in Ireland, so if we were to do the show [in person] they wouldn’t have been able to see it. But even with the eight hour time difference they were able to see me and they said it was the highlight of their long year in isolation.”

Godspell is an incredibly touching story, and although the original show has been performed at Jesuit before in 1970 and 1995, it remains a show that reflects an important message relevant to the modern age.

“I think [Godspell] also relates to the times we are living in right now. There is a song called “Beautiful City” near the end of the show before Jesus is killed, and the lyrics mention how we can slowly start to recover and [that] things may not get better right away, but they will eventually,” said junior Theron Abel. “This is such an important message for us right now, living in these tough times, and we have to realize that things will get better.”

About the Writer
Photo of Chase Kerman
Chase Kerman, Staff Writer

Chase Kerman, a junior at Jesuit High School, is excited to explore Journalism and grow as a writer in her first year taking the class. At Jesuit, Chase...

Senior Gregor McKelligon Uses Music to Express Himself

How as self-taught guitarist found his passion in making music

Senior+Gregor+McKelligon+uses+music+to+express+himself.

Gregor McKelligon

Senior Gregor McKelligon uses music to express himself.

Back in September, I wanted to take the opportunity to highlight student musical talent. On September 21, three videos of exceptional Jesuit musicians, including senior Gregor McKelligon, were sent to the student body to vote on who would perform at Coffeehouse. Here, I interview McKelligon about his personal style, his passion for music, and where he got started.

 

Clevenger: When did you start playing guitar?

 

McKelligon: In 7th grade, I got my first guitar. That same week, [our class] was going to Outdoor School and I really wanted to play, so I grinded that whole week, and sang “The A-Team” in front of everyone. That was the first song I ever learned.”

 

Clevenger: Is that the first instrument you ever learned to play?

 

McKelligon: I played trumpet in middle school. But I probably wouldn’t have gotten a guitar if it weren’t for my sister. She was the one who was always interested in music, which is what inspired me to get into it. She also plays guitar, but she mostly plays country music.

 

Clevenger: Do you have a specific musical style?

 

McKelligon: I would say it’s a mix of alternative-pop-hip-hop.

 

Clevenger: And do you write your own music?

 

McKelligon: Yes, I’ve been writing a lot of music, and have been recording songs since February 2020. I have two songs, which I post on SoundCloud.

 

Clevenger: Have you always been a singer, or is it a skill you have picked up since you started playing guitar?

 

McKelligon: I’ve definitely gotten better at singing over the past few years, but there was a time in my life, when I was a kid, that I wouldn’t sing. You could not get me to sing because I was pretty shy. Now, singing has turned into a way for me to express myself. It’s a very comfortable thing for me. 

 

Clevenger: But you don’t take choir at Jesuit?

 

McKelligon: I took choir my freshman year, as part of the Art Wheel. When I took the class, I was in the middle of trying to figure out how I really felt about music. I liked it, but I didn’t think of it as a passion yet. Over the past two years, though, it’s become my main hobby.

 

Clevenger: Ok, let’s talk about performing. Who do you perform for now? I know you put out that video in September. What made you want to do that?

 

McKelligon: I have performed at Coffeehouse. I did the last Coffeehouse of freshman year, which is when my sister was a senior. That was our last opportunity to do a duet, so we performed together. 

 

Clevenger: So you said you perform with your sister. Do you have anyone else that you sing or perform with?

 

McKelligon: I have friends who have similar interests as me, and we work on music together. [seniors] Aidan Azavedo, Max Barton, Alex Perussi, and Alex Hayes all help me with my music. They take beats from online, and rap over them. Alex and Andrew are the producers, so they work with the microphone, and whatever work comes along with producing. 

 

Clevenger: How many songs have you written?

 

McKelligon: I have a ton of unreleased songs that I’m working on, but I only have two that are out right now. I usually write my own songs. Sometimes I’ll collaborate with my friends. I made a studio in my basement, so that’s where we play.

 

Clevenger: How do you find the time to work on your music?

 

McKelligon: When I have sports, I go to practice after school, and then come home to record a part of a song. Whenever I can find the time. I usually do my homework later at night.

 

Clevenger: Are you a self-taught guitarist?

 

McKelligon: Yes, and it was hard to keep going. After a while, your fingers start to hurt. But I enjoyed music a lot, and it was my way of expressing myself. Sometimes, I don’t even realize I have a feeling inside me until I get it out into a song, and then listening back to the song, the lyrics are so much deeper than I thought. It almost gives me a reflection of myself. I mostly write about things that are going on in my life.

 

I feel like there is a lot of pressure to play a sport or be part of an activity that everyone else is participating in. I like finding my own way. There’s something that makes me happy and excited with myself when I do something that’s different from what other people are doing.

 

Clevenger: When did you start recording your music?

 

McKelligon: I used to use the Voice Memos app on my phone. I didn’t know how to produce or anyone that knew how to produce, so I just started playing guitar and singing, and recording it on my phone. I recorded my first song in January 2020. We recorded it in a closet.

 

I’ve put all my money into this, but my parents are really supportive. I show them my stuff, and they support both me and my sister. I have a few friends that I’ll show all my work to. I haven’t released very much material, so there isn’t a lot for people to base my stuff off of, but I’m a perfectionist, so if I’m going to release something new, I want it to be perfect.

 

My best stuff comes out when I’m having strong feelings. One of my songs, “The Way That You Are,” just came out of me after I was fed up with certain things that were happening in my life. Even though some of the words reflect my anger in that moment, it is probably my best lyrical song. 

Back in September, I wanted to take the opportunity to highlight student musical talent. On September 21, three videos of exceptional Jesuit musicians, including senior Gregor McKelligon, were sent to the student body to vote on who would perform at Coffeehouse. Here, I interview McKelligon about his personal style, his passion for music, and where he got started.

 

Clevenger: When did you start playing guitar?

 

McKelligon: In 7th grade, I got my first guitar. That same week, [our class] was going to Outdoor School and I really wanted to play, so I grinded that whole week, and sang “The A-Team” in front of everyone. That was the first song I ever learned.”

 

Clevenger: Is that the first instrument you ever learned to play?

 

McKelligon: I played trumpet in middle school. But I probably wouldn’t have gotten a guitar if it weren’t for my sister. She was the one who was always interested in music, which is what inspired me to get into it. She also plays guitar, but she mostly plays country music.

 

Clevenger: Do you have a specific musical style?

 

McKelligon: I would say it’s a mix of alternative-pop-hip-hop.

 

Clevenger: And do you write your own music?

 

McKelligon: Yes, I’ve been writing a lot of music, and have been recording songs since February 2020. I have two songs, which I post on SoundCloud.

 

Clevenger: Have you always been a singer, or is it a skill you have picked up since you started playing guitar?

 

McKelligon: I’ve definitely gotten better at singing over the past few years, but there was a time in my life, when I was a kid, that I wouldn’t sing. You could not get me to sing because I was pretty shy. Now, singing has turned into a way for me to express myself. It’s a very comfortable thing for me. 

 

Clevenger: But you don’t take choir at Jesuit?

 

McKelligon: I took choir my freshman year, as part of the Art Wheel. When I took the class, I was in the middle of trying to figure out how I really felt about music. I liked it, but I didn’t think of it as a passion yet. Over the past two years, though, it’s become my main hobby.

 

Clevenger: Ok, let’s talk about performing. Who do you perform for now? I know you put out that video in September. What made you want to do that?

 

McKelligon: I have performed at Coffeehouse. I did the last Coffeehouse of freshman year, which is when my sister was a senior. That was our last opportunity to do a duet, so we performed together. 

 

Clevenger: So you said you perform with your sister. Do you have anyone else that you sing or perform with?

 

McKelligon: I have friends who have similar interests as me, and we work on music together. [seniors] Aidan Azavedo, Max Barton, Alex Perussi, and Alex Hayes all help me with my music. They take beats from online, and rap over them. Alex and Andrew are the producers, so they work with the microphone, and whatever work comes along with producing. 

 

Clevenger: How many songs have you written?

 

McKelligon: I have a ton of unreleased songs that I’m working on, but I only have two that are out right now. I usually write my own songs. Sometimes I’ll collaborate with my friends. I made a studio in my basement, so that’s where we play.

 

Clevenger: How do you find the time to work on your music?

 

McKelligon: When I have sports, I go to practice after school, and then come home to record a part of a song. Whenever I can find the time. I usually do my homework later at night.

 

Clevenger: Are you a self-taught guitarist?

 

McKelligon: Yes, and it was hard to keep going. After a while, your fingers start to hurt. But I enjoyed music a lot, and it was my way of expressing myself. Sometimes, I don’t even realize I have a feeling inside me until I get it out into a song, and then listening back to the song, the lyrics are so much deeper than I thought. It almost gives me a reflection of myself. I mostly write about things that are going on in my life.

 

I feel like there is a lot of pressure to play a sport or be part of an activity that everyone else is participating in. I like finding my own way. There’s something that makes me happy and excited with myself when I do something that’s different from what other people are doing.

 

Clevenger: When did you start recording your music?

 

McKelligon: I used to use the Voice Memos app on my phone. I didn’t know how to produce or anyone that knew how to produce, so I just started playing guitar and singing, and recording it on my phone. I recorded my first song in January 2020. We recorded it in a closet.

 

I’ve put all my money into this, but my parents are really supportive. I show them my stuff, and they support both me and my sister. I have a few friends that I’ll show all my work to. I haven’t released very much material, so there isn’t a lot for people to base my stuff off of, but I’m a perfectionist, so if I’m going to release something new, I want it to be perfect.

 

My best stuff comes out when I’m having strong feelings. One of my songs, “The Way That You Are,” just came out of me after I was fed up with certain things that were happening in my life. Even though some of the words reflect my anger in that moment, it is probably my best lyrical song. 

 

Clevenger: Would you consider pursuing music as a career?

 

McKelligon: I mean, yeah, that’s the goal. I’ll go to college, and music probably won’t be my major, but it may be a side activity, because it is my true passion. My dream is performing.

 

Stay tuned for McKelligon’s new single, “The Day That I Realized,” coming soon to SoundCloud! You can listen to McKelligon’s other songs here: https://soundcloud.app.goo.gl/CwfVkAgf2aw779mM9

Senior Gregor McKelligon uses music to express himself.

 

 

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

A Review of TwoSet Violin’s “Prelude”

A piece, not a song.

Image+courtesy+of+Avni+Sharma.+

Image courtesy of Avni Sharma.

Calling all musicians, Youtube comedy fanatics, and casual modern classical music listeners: TwoSet Violin has officially released their first single. 

Twoset Violin is a popular Youtube comedy duo consisting of Brett Yang and Eddy Chen, based in Brisbane, Australia. Specializing in humorous videos about the everyday struggles of classical musicians, their content has garnered over 710 million views on Youtube, and 5 million followers on social media. Along with composer Jordon He, Yang and Chen surprised their fans by composing and recording their first single, “Prelude”. It was released Oct. 9th, and has since gotten 400 thousand views. 

The piece itself is beautiful, as if one were to imagine themself gliding through a meadow. It’s very reminiscent of Debussy’s style of music, incorporating various violin techniques such as trills, harmonics, and pizzicato. These techniques are meant to bring serenity and dimension to the piece by imitating the sounds of nature, such as the flutter of a bird’s wings or the sound of a babbling brook. Debussy, a composer of the impressionist era, often sought to find inspiration by imitating the beauty and nostalgia of his memories in his music. Composer He found inspiration for this piece the same way. 

“It has many eastern musical elements,” He wrote in a Facebook post. “It is the kind of music I grew up with.”

“Prelude” captures the peaceful and romantic essence of Zanhao’s “Butterfly Lovers Concerto” and the landscape of Massenet’s “Meditation from Thais”. In other words, it marries elements of modern French and Chinese classical music in a unique way. Yang and Chen’s violin skills enhances the piece through expressionist vibrato and varied dynamics. Chen, He, and Yang have created pure art, with “Prelude” painting a picture one can only see by hearing it. 

He recently released the sheet music on Musescore, a free website carrying thousands of free music sheets for musicians to learn. With many Jesuit students being musically inclined, Twoset Violin’s new piece could give students a new avenue to collaborate and bond during quarantine. 

About the Writer
Photo of Avni Sharma
Avni Sharma, Staff Writer

Avni Sharma is a current sophomore at Jesuit High School. She enjoys writing about a wide variety of topics, from music reviews to current politics. Though...

Senior Tanner Olson is the November Artist of the Month

This+colored+pencil+self-portrait+was+created+Olson%E2%80%99s+junior+year.

Tanner Olson

This colored pencil self-portrait was created Olson’s junior year.

When you look at senior Tanner Olson’s artwork, you might surmise that he has been drawing since he learned how to hold a pencil. Unbelievably, Olson only started experimenting with art in sixth grade.

“It was eighth grade when I started taking art seriously,” Olson said. It was just fun to me, and what kicked it off was finding out about the Jesuit art program, and then having the opportunity to go meet with [art teacher] Miss Manning [to review my portfolio].”

Upon entering Jesuit’s art program, Olson learned to work with many new and different media and techniques, including linoleum block printing, clay, and pastels. Even now as an Art IV student, however, Olson contests that his favorite medium is still pencil.

“I think I’m best at realistic drawing in pencil because it was the first thing I was exposed to,” Olson said. “It’s the thing I enjoy doing the most.”

Olson describes his art style as “realistic,” drawing or painting portraits, random household items, or things he finds in nature. His next project, illustrating a series of nine different works, involves painting flowers.

“They’re all different types of flowers,” Olson said. “You can make a connection to people because we all look different, and have different things about us, but we also have similarities [like flowers].”

Open to experimenting with different media, Olson decided to use gouache, which he describes as a mixture of watercolor and acrylic paint, to create his flower series.

“I have been enjoying gouache recently. It’s just fun to play around with because it’s just water and acrylic paint,” Olson said.

When asked what the most challenging part of the Jesuit art program has been, Olson says that it has been difficult to try not to compare himself to other artists.

“I don’t want to feel like I’m making art for competition,” Olson said. “It doesn’t really feel great. I’d rather do art for fun or to express a deeper meaning.”

Like many artists, Olson is inspired by the work of fellow artists. Using social media, he browses through different works, combining some of the ideas he sees with his unique art style.

“Seeing other pieces on like Instagram and seeing other people’s art really inspires me,” Olson said. “A good portion of my art has a deeper meaning, like self-reflection or self-expression. I make a lot of self portrait pieces.”

So where did he get his artistic talent from?

“My grandma is a really good artist. She hasn’t taught me much, but maybe there’s something genetic,” Olson said.

Additionally, Olson offers sage advice on what it takes to be a great artist.

“I think a lot of people may not realize this, but I’d say art takes more time than it does skill. If you want something to look good, you’re gonna have to invest a lot of time into it,” Olson said.

Tanner Olson’s twin brother, senior Tyler Olson, describes his brother as artistic, quiet, and respectful.

“We can’t stay mad at each other,” Tyler Olson said. “If we ever fight, it never lasts more than an hour. He’s very understanding.”

Senior Samantha Le met Tanner Olson at Holy Trinity Elementary School, and have known each other since kindergarten. Le agrees that he has always been quiet, and, like Tyler Olson, knows he is respectful.

“I have known Tanner since kindergarten, but we didn’t become good friends until eighth grade,” Le said. “I would describe Tanner as kind, reserved, and selfless.”

Friend and Art IV peer senior Tori Nguyen met Tanner through close friends and through the Jesuit art program. Nguyen praises Tanner Olson’s work, highlighting his meaningful and thoughtful art process.

“Tanner draws very meticulous things or small things that draw your eye, or things that you wouldn’t maybe notice at first,” Nguyen said. “It’s all well thought out and deliberate.”

Does Tanner Olson see art in his future?

“I might minor in art. Maybe drawing and illustration. I also really do enjoy painting.”

Created his senior year, Olson was tasked with drawing a shoe in pencil as realistically as possible. (Tanner Olson)

 

Olson created this as a senior for the first art project of the year. (Tanner Olson)

 

This pencil drawing created by Olson was done not for an art project but for fun. (Tanner Olson)

 

Olson created this gouache piece for an art project junior year. (Tanner Olson)
About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Godspell and Freshman Ensemble Rehearse in Person

Students+Rehearse+Godspell+on+Campus.+Photo+Curtsey+of+Ms.+Kloser+

Elaine Kloser

Students Rehearse Godspell on Campus. Photo Curtsey of Ms. Kloser

This October the cast of Godspell and the Freshman Ensemble has been lucky enough to rehearse in person on campus. The plays were originally imagined to be completely virtual. Meetings surrounding the plays, auditions, and even the first couple of rehearsals were virtual. However, after discussing with the administration, the drama program has recently been granted access to rehearse in person. Drama teacher Elaine Kloser explained how the drama program is able to meet.

“Small cohorts of the cast of Godspell and the Freshman Ensemble are able to hold rehearsal at school now a few times a week,” Ms. Kloser said. “t’s been nice to have such lovely fall weather lately because the groups can meet outside, and the administration has put up some tents in the Hayes Plaza, so even when the weather changes, we will still be able to meet outside!”

Cohorts of students vary from around eight-to-nine kids on campus at a time. Performers, as well as tech theatre students gather together to rehearse and work  on technical elements. Although the numbers are small, the drama program enforces strict rules regarding masks and social distancing.

“I overall think rehearsals have been going great,” Senior Mackenzie Jaimes said.  “They are pretty much the same as last year except for our warmup games and the fact that we need to sing in masks at all times.”

Rehearsing during COVID-19 is drastically different than rehearsing during the normal school year.

“It’s definitely been so much different from past years,” Jaimes said. “In our warmup games we cannot touch at all so games like tag, which are super fun, are out. It’s also really hard to see where we need to be placed on the stage.  Being so far from each other is definitely a challenge.”

Mackenzie is lucky enough to have her ensemble to perform in person. The other ensembles will also be performing, but in a mix of pre-recorded videos and virtual appearances. The hope is that soon all ensembles will be able to perform on stage together, but for now, it’s amazing that they can even meet in person during these challenging times.

While Godspell is a very important play, it is not the only one being performed this year. The Freshman Ensemble is also rehearsing for a digital performance.

“The freshmen ensemble has created a safe place where I’m free to express myself through acting,” freshman Isabel Diab said. “Each rehearsal has taught me so much about drama, and I’ve been able to form some amazing relationships through this experience”.

During the pandemic, it has been hard to make new connections with other students, especially for the freshman who have not met most of their classmates. In a time where it is very difficult for groups to congregate together, it is amazing that drama students have the opportunity to rehearse in person and create new relationships.

“Come November, we will be sure to share with the Jesuit Community the way in which we will be presenting Godspell,” Ms. Kloser said.  “If none of the metrics for the State of Oregon change between now and then, at least we know that Jesuit students will be able to watch Godspell in recorded format.  We think that whatever way our audience is able to view it that they will find much relevance to the world around them in the songs and parables!  Our goal is to keep Art and Hope alive during this uncertain time!”

About the Contributor
Photo of Gwynne Olson
Gwynne Olson, Executive Editor-at-Large and Social Media Executive

Gwynne Olson is a junior staff writer for the Jesuit Chronicle. Gwynne is the youngest of two. Brooke, her older sister, is a recent graduate from the...

Crusader Comics: Halloween Horrors

A Comic

Charlie+Crusader+is+not+phased+by+the+geese%E2%80%99s+attempt+to+frighten+him.

Steele Clevenger

Charlie Crusader is not phased by the geese’s attempt to frighten him.

Charlie Crusader is not phased by the geese’s attempt to frighten him. (Steele Clevenger)
About the Contributor
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Junior Sophia Gard is October’s Artist of the Month

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Sophia Gard

This acrylic painting is a self-portrait by October Artist of the Month, junior Sophia Gard

As a preschooler, junior Sophia Gard experienced her first memory of art.

“My mom used to go to Costco and buy those thin-line notebooks, and I would just fill those up,” said Gard.

In elementary and middle school, Gard tried to find inspiration in art, however her art class was less than encouraging.

Said Gard, “It would just be like gluing paper to paper—that kind of thing. I wasn’t that excited by it, but we got a better art teacher, and [otherwise] I’ve kind of taught myself using the internet and reading books.”

Gard entered Jesuit High School in 2018, and finally felt motivated to focus on her artistic talents in Danielle Chi’s Art I class. There, she honed her portraiture skills, and rekindled her love for the pencil sketches she would create in the lined notebooks she had as a little kid.

When asked what her favorite medium was, Gard said, “I love using pencil. Graphite is nice, and I love using colored pencils, too, but they’re a lot harder. When I want to go for something quick, I go straight to my mechanical pencil.”

As an artist, Gard mentioned that she won a Silver Key her freshman year in the Scholastic Art Contest, and illustrated this year’s planner cover. But Gard says her greatest art achievement is not a piece of artwork at all. 

“My mindset has gotten a lot more positive recently, and I’m really proud of that. I still compare myself, but when I do, I’ll tell myself, “I’m doing so good right now,” and, “I think I can push myself,” rather than, “I suck.”” said Gard.

Art I and II teacher Danielle Chi said of Gard, “She came into Art I with a good deal of skills and experience, and has continued to seek feedback, experiment, and grow as an artist. When challenges come up in life and in an art piece, Sophia does not give up.”

Juniors Cayte Worthington and Theron Abel, both members of the Art III class this year, describe Gard as innovative and undaunted, but sweet.

“I remember in freshman year when we were decorating our portfolios, I drew a couple things relating to Vine references and a few TV shows we liked, and she got so excited that it made me want to draw even more.” said Worthington. “She’s always happy to give me tips and insights when I’m having trouble finding what I need to add or how to start my drawings.” 

Both Worthington and Abel are also aware of how friendly and welcoming Gard is towards her peers.

“She’s very humble, and I really respect that. I think as a person her greatest strength is just being there for her friends,” said Worthington. “She’s always willing to be a friend, and is always making sure that you’re alright.” 

Abel also says that Gard is everybody’s friend, conversing with students in art class and making them feel comfortable.

Said Abel, “Sophia inspires me to trust the process and always be open-minded. Things might not always be going the way you want them to, but she is always there to help you keep going.”

About the Contributor
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Photography Class Slideshow Composition Skills 1.0

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Wondering what to watch?: Your guide to the best shows to watch during quarantine

A brief guide to some of the best TV to watch during social distancing.

Wondering what to watch?: Your guide to the best shows to watch during quarantine
Picture this: School has just been cancelled for over a month, and you’re feeling lost on what to do. You are sitting at home, staring at a family picture you think you look bad in, so bored that you’re thinking about what would happen if you decided to jump start the Purge. Suddenly, you remember the overabundance of streaming services your family has, and you rush to the TV and grab the remote. Then you freeze. You think, “do I check out an old Disney Channel show on Disney+? Do I try to watch Breaking Bad to seem nuanced on Netflix? Do I finally start Handmaid’s Tale on Hulu because everyone tells me it’s amazing and I know I have to watch it but I feel a little behind because I never read the original book so will I even understand it?” Eventually you shut off the TV and decide to take your fourth nap of the day.
The streaming service world is a hard, unforgiving world. If you are anything like me, the overwhelming amount of content on all streaming services, especially multiple streaming services, leaves me feeling tired just from 5 minutes of scrolling. TV shows are especially hard, because it’s not only a commitment but there are Just. So. Many.
So, I’ve decided to compile a list of the best TV shows to watch on the big 4 of streaming services so you can finally have some peace of mind. And because you need a new commitment. I know it’s scary, but it’s time. You got this.


I Am Not Okay With This: A show about some teens and some superpowers and some crazy situations. It’ll surprise you and confuse you all at the same time. But it’s great! It also has very short, easy-to-digest episodes for you Tik Tok users out there who can barely pay attention to any video longer than 20 seconds. Go crazy! Hey, it even has the kids from It!

Schitt’s Creek: If Eugene Levy’s eyebrows aren’t enough to draw you into this show, it’s witty writing and hilarious cast will. Focusing on an uber-rich family who loses their house and wealth and goes to live in a motel they bought, the comedy is all of the ridiculous fun you’d expect. Also, it’s Canadian. And everyone loves Canada! Just wait until you hear them say “sorry”.

Russian Doll: I have nothing to say except that this is the best show on Netflix, period. And it’s much better if you don’t know the plot. Do yourself a favor and watch it.

The Circle: Like reality TV? Like to hate on random people you don’t know in real life? Want to see a Black Mirror episode without the scary stuff? This is the show for you. Watch a bunch of really beautiful people try to win a popularity contest and try and figure out how they aren’t getting bored living by themselves.

Star Trek: Because you deserve it. I don’t care who you are, but the classic Star Trek show is the most relaxing thing you can watch. It’s so great. The very definition of an oldie but a goodie.

 

Mr. Robot: You know, the one with the guy who looks like he needs to catch up on sleep? Spoiler alert: he does. If you like hacking and intense camera angles, this is the show for you. It’s smart and quick and will make you wish you were better with tech. It had plenty of twists and turns to keep you awake even through the parts when they are just talking about IT. I don’t get it either, trust me.

Fleabag: Remember that show that kept winning all of those Emmy’s? Turns out, it is just as good as everyone says! Phoebe Waller-Bridge is just her comedic genius self, and her character wanders through London trying to figure out what to do with her life while a bunch of random people keep popping up. The show is both funny and slightly depressing. It’s perfect! Also, you’ll wonder why no one has names and wish you could give them some.

Hunters: This one’s weird. But if you miss Logan Lerman as much as I, get on it. A bunch of people decide to hunt down a bunch of Nazis living out in New York. It’s a lot, I agree, but dang if it isn’t entertaining. It’s also based on a true story, which makes even weirder and crazier. Check it out.

Modern Love: For all you romantic people out there, this one’s it. It’s an anthology series about people falling in love. It’s pretty feel-good and will make you feel extremely single. But that’s okay. The right person will come along eventually. In the meantime, if you want to cry over fictional character’s relationships, watch this show.


 

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: Need I even say anything? This is one of the few shows that you can hit a random episode of and not be confused or frustrated because you didn’t watch any of the previous ones. If you are thinking of committing a crime out of boredom, this show will talk you out of it. It’s gross, it gets pretty sad, but you’ll keep watching it anyway, because you’re weird like that.

Community: Wondering how to fill that hole in your heart when The Office is removed from Netflix? This is the show for you. Centering around a group of community college goers, it’s one of the funniest and sweetest shows out there, with one of the best casts in a sitcom to date! It’s just so good!! Can you tell I’m biased?! Also if you want to see a young(er) Donald Glover… ahh, what am I talking about, of course you do!

Wu-Tang: An American Saga: For rap and history fans, this show portrays the lives and rise to fame of the members of the Wu-Tang Clan. It’s such good TV. Even if you don’t know anything about the Wu-Tang, do yourself a favor and learn. Bring Da Ruckus!

Looking for Alaska: Remember that book you read in 7th grade that you thought you were super cool for having? Well, it’s a show now! And even though it’s just as corny as you remember the book being, it’s also a heartfelt nostalgia trip back to the early 2000s. It’ll make you giggle, it’ll make you cry, it’ll make you say “wow, I thought John really did something when I was 12.”

Atlanta: Yes, this is the second time Donald Glover has appeared on this list and I ain’t sorry. Atlanta is about, well Atlanta. It’s one of those shows that’s so wacky that I can’t really explain it. It’s one of the most well-made, clever shows out there though, so do yourself and favor and give it a shot. And stay woke!


Suite Life of Zack and Cody: The best show Disney ever put out. And that’s on 2000s haircuts! No, you definitely aren’t too old to watch it. There’s nothing that puts a smile on your face like Suite Life. It’s perfect. I have no critiques. It’s what every show after it strives to be like.

Wizards of Waverly Place: It’s just as good as you remember! The outfits are just as wacky as you thought! You’ll still wish you were a wizard! Selena Gomez is a queen! There’s nothing to not love about this show. The intro song is straight up everything. If there’s any show to revisit it’s this.

Hannah Montana: If you don’t want to see Miley Cyrus in her tangled wig, you are lying. The show holds up. It’s fun, it’s a great time passer, and it’s the really good kind of nostalgia. And Every. Song. Slaps.

High School Musical: The Musical (The Series): It’s so cute. If you are a die-hard HSM fan, you’ll love it. Featuring Teens Singing At Inappropriate Times, Teens Having Beef With Eachother, Teens Who Definitely Shouldn’t Be Dancing In This Situation. It’s a fun time, even if it isn’t the original.

The Mandalorian: Whether or not you understand or appreciate Star Wars… it has Baby Yoda in it. And it may be an old meme, but he never gets less cute. It’s worth it for him. Do it for Baby Yoda.

About the Writer
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Jayla Lowery, Alumni 2019-2020

Jayla Lowery is a current senior at Jesuit High School. She enjoys biking, reading, swimming, music, daydreaming, watching movies, and writing mediocre...

Eternal Atake by Lil Uzi Vert- Review

Eternal Atake by Lil Uzi Vert Album Cover. Album released March 6th 2020.

Lil Uzi Vert

Eternal Atake by Lil Uzi Vert Album Cover. Album released March 6th 2020.

Eternal Atake Lil Uzi Vert’s new album released on March 13 2020 after two years of his fans longing for this album. During those years Uzi got into a feud with rapper Rich the Kid and even almost retired saying “I wanna take the time out to say I thank each and every one of supporters but I’m done with music I deleted everything I wanna be normal … I wanna wake up in 2013” on his Instagram story. Needless to say fans were really excited when this album was released.  This is Uzi’s second studio album, his first being Love is Rage 2 released in 2017.

 

The album starts out with the song “Baby Pluto” which is Uzi’s alter ego rap name. The song mostly is Uzi bragging about the luxuries and cars he has.  In the first part of the album Uzi shows off his hard hitting and more trappy style of music with songs like “Baby Pluto”, “Silly Watch” and “Pop”, in these songs Uzi does not sing a lot and relies on rap more. 

 

The album then takes a sharp turn and Uzi starts showing off his melodie skills in songs like “I’m Sorry” and “Bigger Than Life”. These songs remind me of one of Uzi’s old songs “The Way Life Goes” on Love is Rage 2. These songs are all pretty dark songs where he talks about breakups. 

 

We also see Uzi show his happy side that is surprising to see from him in songs like “Homecoming” and “Celebration Station”. In these songs he talks about dancing, money, partying  and overall just having a fun time.  

 

One of the next songs of the album “Chrome Heart Tags” another rapper Chief Keef Produced the beat.  This is the first ever beat produced by Chief Keef to be put in a major label album release. This is not the first time Uzi Has rapped on one of Chief Keef’s beats though, he was featured on a song called “Cap Flow” by DooWop. 

 

Next in the album is Uzi only track with another artist, “Urgency” featuring Syd. Syd is a woman singer who was previously in the popular band Odd Future.  In the song Uzi shows off his singing ability and rapping ability. Syd and Uzi collaborate really well together and make the song sound smooth.

 

Later in the album the song “P2” appears, any fan of Uzi immediately knew this was a sequel to “XO TOUR Llif3” Uzi’s top song on his last album. The songs sound so similar and use some of the same lyrics. Both of the songs are produced by the same producer TM88.  

Eternal Atake Lil Uzi Vert’s new album released on March 13 2020 after two years of his fans longing for this album. During those years Uzi got into a feud with rapper Rich the Kid and even almost retired saying “I wanna take the time out to say I thank each and every one of supporters but I’m done with music I deleted everything I wanna be normal … I wanna wake up in 2013” on his Instagram story. Needless to say fans were really excited when this album was released.  This is Uzi’s second studio album, his first being Love is Rage 2 released in 2017.

 

The album starts out with the song “Baby Pluto” which is Uzi’s alter ego rap name. The song mostly is Uzi bragging about the luxuries and cars he has.  In the first part of the album Uzi shows off his hard hitting and more trappy style of music with songs like “Baby Pluto”, “Silly Watch” and “Pop”, in these songs Uzi does not sing a lot and relies on rap more. 

 

The album then takes a sharp turn and Uzi starts showing off his melodie skills in songs like “I’m Sorry” and “Bigger Than Life”. These songs remind me of one of Uzi’s old songs “The Way Life Goes” on Love is Rage 2. These songs are all pretty dark songs where he talks about breakups. 

 

We also see Uzi show his happy side that is surprising to see from him in songs like “Homecoming” and “Celebration Station”. In these songs he talks about dancing, money, partying  and overall just having a fun time.  

 

One of the next songs of the album “Chrome Heart Tags” another rapper Chief Keef Produced the beat.  This is the first ever beat produced by Chief Keef to be put in a major label album release. This is not the first time Uzi Has rapped on one of Chief Keef’s beats though, he was featured on a song called “Cap Flow” by DooWop. 

 

Next in the album is Uzi only track with another artist, “Urgency” featuring Syd. Syd is a woman singer who was previously in the popular band Odd Future.  In the song Uzi shows off his singing ability and rapping ability. Syd and Uzi collaborate really well together and make the song sound smooth.

 

Later in the album the song “P2” appears, any fan of Uzi immediately knew this was a sequel to “XO TOUR Llif3” Uzi’s top song on his last album. The songs sound so similar and use some of the same lyrics. Both of the songs are produced by the same producer TM88.  At the end of the album there are two already released singles or Bonus tracks “Futsal Shuffle 2020” and “That Way”. “Futsal Shuffle 2020” was released in 2019 and has a very electric feel to it and many people think that the beat sounds like the old mobile game Geometry Dash.  “That Way” was released in 2020 and includes A chant from “I Want It That Way” By the Backstreet Boys.

 

This album is overall everything I wanted from Uzi and more. Even though he kept on dragging on his fans for two years he delivered and put out a great long album. 

At the end of the album there are two already released singles or Bonus tracks “Futsal Shuffle 2020” and “That Way”. “Futsal Shuffle 2020” was released in 2019 and has a very electric feel to it and many people think that the beat sounds like the old mobile game Geometry Dash.  “That Way” was released in 2020 and includes A chant from “I Want It That Way” By the Backstreet Boys.

 

This album is overall everything I wanted from Uzi and more. Even though he kept on dragging on his fans for two years he delivered and put out a great long album. 

About the Writer
Photo of JJ Gray
JJ Gray, Staff Writer







JJ Gray is a junior and this will be his second year in  journalism student, he is excited to be in the class and have a great time. In JJ’s...

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