Jesuit Chronicle

Senior Jamie Turner is February’s Artist of the Month

Senior+Jamie+Turner+is+February%E2%80%99s+Artist+of+the+Month.%0A

Jamie Turner

Senior Jamie Turner is February’s Artist of the Month.

“I used to do art all the time with my grandma [when I was seven or eight],” senior Jamie Turner said of her earliest memories of art. “It started with knitting, and we made a lot of quilts, and, eventually, she gave me colored pencils and paints. I can remember my grandma and I doing art and [listening] to music and playing with her cats.”

Turner took art classes and camps in middle school, however, never felt she was good enough to make it part of her future.

“It was always my favorite class, but for some reason I thought I had to be the most amazing artist to do art in high school, so I didn’t submit a portfolio for the art class [at Jesuit],” Turner said.

As teacher of the Art Wheel elective, Sascha Manning discovered Turner’s artistic abilities, and asked to join the advanced art program. 

“I’m super grateful for [Ms. Manning],” Turner said. “She’s probably the reason I’m so into art now. I’m pretty sure I cried because I was excited [to be in the art program].”

As a member of the Art IV class now, Turner reflects on her experience in Jesuit’s Art Program.

“I met some of my closest friends through art, and it’s always been that class where I know I don’t have to be nervous about what I say, and I can be 100% myself,” Turner said. “The classes allowed me to go at my own pace, and I love that I can talk to my friends, and I feel really connected to my classmates.”

Turner says her favorite medium to work with is acrylic paint, noting that it is a “good combination where [she] can be really precise but can also mix colors well.” She draws inspiration from a wide range of topics: the female identity, her family identity, and her identity as a person.

“I really like using bright colors and squiggles and things that make a statement,” Turner said. “When it comes to painting people, I’m more realistic, but I also like doing pieces that are more semi-realistic, kind of cartoon-y, and spunky.”

Now for the big question: does Turner see a future in art?

“I actually kind of do [see a future in art],” Turner said.” I see myself taking art classes through college, and maybe pursuing it as a minor. I would love to teach art to little kids or have a studio so I can keep it fun [instead of] for profit. My end [career] goal is to be an English professor.”

Turner says her greatest achievement as an artist has been painting her “Integrated Artists” piece, an Art III assignment combining two artists’s styles into one painting.

“For that piece, it was the first time I really sat down and decided what I wanted to do, and it came out exactly like I wanted it to,” Turner said. “In the past, I tended to rush into things and get really excited, but for this one, I really paced myself.”

Conversely, Turner’s greatest challenge as an artist was becoming confident in her art style.

“I kind of hit like a slump, my sophomore year,” Turner said. “I kind of got in my head and told myself ‘you’re not as good as any other people in your class,’ and I had negative self talk. But after that, I feel like I bounced back, and now I’m more confident and have a more pronounced style.”

Currently Turner is working on an avant garde fashion project in Art IV. She has been tasked with creating a wearable art piece using only cardboard, glue, and yarn. In addition to projects for school, Turner is the Creative Director of a non-profit organization called Student Tutor Students.

Turner’s friends and fellow Art IV student seniors Nathan Hasbrook and Ella Jewell met Turner in Manning’s Art I class freshman year.

“Jamie has a unique aptitude for symbolism, the way she paints and draws things that you wouldn’t ever think about,” Jewell said. “Her art is so impressive, and she creates it from such a passionate heart. As a person, she is so funny. I am never uncomfortable or unsure of how to act around Jamie, and it was this from the first day I met her. She explores world issues in her art, and her empathy and understanding of people definitely transfers into her pieces.

“Jamie definitely has pushed me to continue embracing my artistic style and follow what I enjoy doing. I personally struggle with finding the right idea to springboard my art with, and she always helps me settle on something that I can truly have fun with and be proud of,” Hasbrook added. “She continually captures that in her own art, and it inspires me to use my own passions to create more meaningful artwork.”

 

Jamie Turner
Jamie Turner
Jamie Turner
Jamie Turner
About the Writer
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Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

No Day Like a Snow Day

A student wakes up to snow! … only to remember that virtual learning is still an option. (Steele Clevenger)

 

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Dear Charlie: An Advice Column with Charlie Crusader

Writing+a+letter+brings+joy+to+those+who+receive+it%2C+and+it+highlights+the+joy+of+giving+during+the+holiday+season.+%0A

Steele

Writing a letter brings joy to those who receive it, and it highlights the joy of giving during the holiday season.

Dear Charlie,

 

I am a junior, and though I was excited to become an upperclassman this year, I feel lost. My homework keeps stacking up, there is pressure to think about colleges, and I feel like I’m not taking on a big enough leadership role in the community.

 

Junior year is supposed to be the year I come out of my shell and become more independent. But now, I’m stuck at home stressing about all the work I haven’t done. Help!

 

Signed, 

 

So Much To Do, So Little Time

 

Dear So Much To Do,

 

In the words of Billy Joel, “Slow down, you crazy child!” As a junior, it may feel like the year to make your mark at Jesuit. If you are feeling motivated, go for it, but during the holidays, Admissions Director Erin DeKlotz recommends a simple six step plan to help you relax and take the pressure of success off your shoulders. 

 

“Breathe, move, rest, laugh, give, pray, and connect,” DeKlotz said. “I know when I’m stressed, I find myself holding my breath. Focus on breathing deeply. If you’re on your couch all day, stay physically active, even if it’s taking a walk. Get enough sleep. Try not to watch the news too much. Give back to your community.”

 

Deklotz said that practicing gratitude is also another big part of her life. She advocates for journaling, and making a habit of writing down one item that she is grateful for every day, like a warm blanket or a cup of coffee.

 

AP Psychology and Macroeconomics teacher Malia Bernards is a big believer in staying active, not only physically, but mentally.

 

“Challenge yourself to learn something new, something you’re interested in that has nothing to do with school, whether that’s sketching or baking or learning to cook,” Bernards said.

 

As the year comes to an end, focus on making connections, rest before the new year, and focus on your health. That will help you reach your goals of making your mark when the school year starts back up.

 

Signed,

 

Charlie

 

Dear Charlie, 

 

I am a freshman, and high school is a bit overwhelming. I wanted to do really well in my classes at the beginning of the year, but I’m kind of burnt out after a crazy year of COVID, wildfires, and quarantine. I thought high school was about meeting new people, going to dances, and taking every opportunity, but I am the only person from my school to come to Jesuit, and I feel very isolated because I don’t know anyone.

 

How can I make connections with new friends?

 

Signed,

 

Down and Out

 

Dear Down and Out

 

Making connections can be tricky, but it is a natural, and necessary, part of life, one which is especially important during not only a pandemic, but also the holidays.

 

“Swallow your pride,” DeKlotz said. “Be brave. Try randomly reaching out to people and see what you get. Don’t worry too much if you get silence. Maybe someone said something in a Zoom class that you appreciated, and you could text them and let them know that you appreciated their comment. I’ve heard people say it meant the world to them when someone reached out and texted them. Don’t underestimate the power of small acts of hope that you bring to other people.”

 

Theology teacher Sara Salzwedel mentioned some ways to reach out to family members of close friends during the pandemic-themed holiday season.

 

“Write letters to friends,” Salzwedel said. “Think about people to whom you could tangibly send something in the mail. I think anytime we start to go beyond ourselves, having those brief moments of respite where we put our focus on someone else I think really does help.”

 

Salzwedel and Bernards agree that the holidays are a time to check in with ourselves. 

 

“Just remember to take care of yourself first,” Bernards said. “We teachers are more concerned about [students’] health and well-being. Get outside and get some fresh air. Reach out for help. It’s okay to be vulnerable. Everyone is vulnerable right now.”

 

It may be difficult to begin your high school career like this, but take care of yourself, reach out to people, and surround yourself with people and things you love this holiday season.

 

Don’t forget to reach out to old acquaintances. Touching base with friends, catching up on Zoom, or even getting together while socially distancing can make your season that much brighter.

 

Signed,

 

Charlie

 

Charlie encourages you to talk to a counselor or trusted adult if you have any concerns.

Writing a letter brings joy to those who receive it, and it highlights the joy of giving during the holiday season.
(Steele )
About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Stella Bonta is December’s Artist of the Month

Stella+Bonta+is+December%E2%80%99s+Artist+of+the+Month.

Stella Bonta

Stella Bonta is December’s Artist of the Month.

When she was four, freshman Stella Bonta remembers drawing images of her family, the sun in the top left corner of the page, and grass across the bottom. 

 

“Whenever [my sister and I] would draw the grass, we have this texture on the walls in our house. I remember we would hold the paper up to the wall, and like, color, so it had texture,” Bonta said.

 

At the age of six, Bonta recalls a time when she was frustrated at a drawing, foreshadowing her future as an artist and self-proclaimed perfectionist.

 

“I was drawing at the kitchen table because I actually had free time when I was six. I was trying to draw something that did not look like a stick figure, something with arms with actual thickness. I remember trying so hard, and I just got so frustrated, and went back to drawing stick figures with three fingers and like the triangle body.

 

In elementary school, Bonta did not have a regular art class. Once a year, however, an art teacher would visit her class and give a lesson. In middle school, Bonta began to have a regular art class, although she said she had a difficult time relating to the type of art that was taught in the class. 

 

“It was cool, but my main teacher for art has really just been YouTube,” Bonta said. 

 

When it came to auditioning for the Jesuit Art Program, Bonta submitted her work to a Padlet, where it was reviewed by art teachers Sascha Manning and Danielle Chi. 

 

“She has a really good sense of color composition, all of those fundamentals that are needed for the advanced class,” Manning said. “Her work has a lot of expression in it, and she has very strong skills in drawing faces and hands.”

Manning also admires how hard Bonta works and how much time and effort she spends on her art. She described her as “expressive,” “friendly,” and “enthusiastic.”

 

“Stella is a very friendly person in every breakout room that she is in. She gets everyone interacting. People find her very approachable. She also very thoughtful and her enthusiasm really comes through very easily,” Manning said

 

Bonta says she has two separate art styles: one very realistic for portraits, the other for character sketches and “draw-this-in-your-style” challenges on Instagram. 

 

“The proportions are bigger and everything’s a bit more exaggerated —it’s semi-realistic,” Bonta said. 

 

Bonta’s favorite medium right now is watercolor because it is “unpredictable.” She says she could not use watercolor until she bought a travel set, and realized she was using way too much water. Now, watercolor is an integral part of her artwork. 

 

Right now in her Art I Advanced Class, Bonta is working on an art project pertaining to environmental justice and climate change. 

 

“The idea is to have Mother Nature in the center being suffocated by the human race, an image of suffering, Bonta said. 

 

Aside from practicing her art at Jesuit and posting her work on Instagram, Bonta has her own YouTube Channel for her art, which she started in eighth grade. She said the most challenging part of having a YouTube Channel, and being an artist in general, is “art block,” and having difficulty being creative. Despite this challenge Bonta continues to work on her art.

 

I feel like since COVID, art is a huge part of my life now,” Bonta said. I cannot go a day without drawing something. Art has totally shifted roles in my life. It is now my main creative outlet.”

 

Fellow Art I Advanced freshman Emma Williams described Bonta as funny and kind, even though she has only met her through Zoom this year!

 

“I met [Stella] through our second art class when we were in a break out room together,” Williams said. “She has amazing [art] technique and I love how nice she is to everyone. She also has a great sense of humor.“

 

When asked what advice she would give to beginner artists, Bonta said that patience and persistence are important to putting out one’s best work.

 

There’s always more to learn,” Bonta said. “There’s always something I can improve on, study, or practice. Get out of the mindset of “it’s good enough.” Be patient, don’t try to finish as fast as you can.”

 

Does Bonta see art in her future?

 

“I want art to have a significant role in what I’d do in the future,” Bonta said. “I would love to have a career in art, but I could also do it on the side because I also love linguistics.”

 

This piece was done in colored pencil by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
This piece was done in pencil by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
This piece was done in colored pencil by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
A digital piece by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
A digital piece by Stella Bonta. (Stella Bonta)
About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Crusader Comics: A Covid Christmas

Crusader+Comics%3A+A+Covid+Christmas

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Senior Gregor McKelligon Uses Music to Express Himself

How as self-taught guitarist found his passion in making music

Senior+Gregor+McKelligon+uses+music+to+express+himself.

Gregor McKelligon

Senior Gregor McKelligon uses music to express himself.

Back in September, I wanted to take the opportunity to highlight student musical talent. On September 21, three videos of exceptional Jesuit musicians, including senior Gregor McKelligon, were sent to the student body to vote on who would perform at Coffeehouse. Here, I interview McKelligon about his personal style, his passion for music, and where he got started.

 

Clevenger: When did you start playing guitar?

 

McKelligon: In 7th grade, I got my first guitar. That same week, [our class] was going to Outdoor School and I really wanted to play, so I grinded that whole week, and sang “The A-Team” in front of everyone. That was the first song I ever learned.”

 

Clevenger: Is that the first instrument you ever learned to play?

 

McKelligon: I played trumpet in middle school. But I probably wouldn’t have gotten a guitar if it weren’t for my sister. She was the one who was always interested in music, which is what inspired me to get into it. She also plays guitar, but she mostly plays country music.

 

Clevenger: Do you have a specific musical style?

 

McKelligon: I would say it’s a mix of alternative-pop-hip-hop.

 

Clevenger: And do you write your own music?

 

McKelligon: Yes, I’ve been writing a lot of music, and have been recording songs since February 2020. I have two songs, which I post on SoundCloud.

 

Clevenger: Have you always been a singer, or is it a skill you have picked up since you started playing guitar?

 

McKelligon: I’ve definitely gotten better at singing over the past few years, but there was a time in my life, when I was a kid, that I wouldn’t sing. You could not get me to sing because I was pretty shy. Now, singing has turned into a way for me to express myself. It’s a very comfortable thing for me. 

 

Clevenger: But you don’t take choir at Jesuit?

 

McKelligon: I took choir my freshman year, as part of the Art Wheel. When I took the class, I was in the middle of trying to figure out how I really felt about music. I liked it, but I didn’t think of it as a passion yet. Over the past two years, though, it’s become my main hobby.

 

Clevenger: Ok, let’s talk about performing. Who do you perform for now? I know you put out that video in September. What made you want to do that?

 

McKelligon: I have performed at Coffeehouse. I did the last Coffeehouse of freshman year, which is when my sister was a senior. That was our last opportunity to do a duet, so we performed together. 

 

Clevenger: So you said you perform with your sister. Do you have anyone else that you sing or perform with?

 

McKelligon: I have friends who have similar interests as me, and we work on music together. [seniors] Aidan Azavedo, Max Barton, Alex Perussi, and Alex Hayes all help me with my music. They take beats from online, and rap over them. Alex and Andrew are the producers, so they work with the microphone, and whatever work comes along with producing. 

 

Clevenger: How many songs have you written?

 

McKelligon: I have a ton of unreleased songs that I’m working on, but I only have two that are out right now. I usually write my own songs. Sometimes I’ll collaborate with my friends. I made a studio in my basement, so that’s where we play.

 

Clevenger: How do you find the time to work on your music?

 

McKelligon: When I have sports, I go to practice after school, and then come home to record a part of a song. Whenever I can find the time. I usually do my homework later at night.

 

Clevenger: Are you a self-taught guitarist?

 

McKelligon: Yes, and it was hard to keep going. After a while, your fingers start to hurt. But I enjoyed music a lot, and it was my way of expressing myself. Sometimes, I don’t even realize I have a feeling inside me until I get it out into a song, and then listening back to the song, the lyrics are so much deeper than I thought. It almost gives me a reflection of myself. I mostly write about things that are going on in my life.

 

I feel like there is a lot of pressure to play a sport or be part of an activity that everyone else is participating in. I like finding my own way. There’s something that makes me happy and excited with myself when I do something that’s different from what other people are doing.

 

Clevenger: When did you start recording your music?

 

McKelligon: I used to use the Voice Memos app on my phone. I didn’t know how to produce or anyone that knew how to produce, so I just started playing guitar and singing, and recording it on my phone. I recorded my first song in January 2020. We recorded it in a closet.

 

I’ve put all my money into this, but my parents are really supportive. I show them my stuff, and they support both me and my sister. I have a few friends that I’ll show all my work to. I haven’t released very much material, so there isn’t a lot for people to base my stuff off of, but I’m a perfectionist, so if I’m going to release something new, I want it to be perfect.

 

My best stuff comes out when I’m having strong feelings. One of my songs, “The Way That You Are,” just came out of me after I was fed up with certain things that were happening in my life. Even though some of the words reflect my anger in that moment, it is probably my best lyrical song. 

Back in September, I wanted to take the opportunity to highlight student musical talent. On September 21, three videos of exceptional Jesuit musicians, including senior Gregor McKelligon, were sent to the student body to vote on who would perform at Coffeehouse. Here, I interview McKelligon about his personal style, his passion for music, and where he got started.

 

Clevenger: When did you start playing guitar?

 

McKelligon: In 7th grade, I got my first guitar. That same week, [our class] was going to Outdoor School and I really wanted to play, so I grinded that whole week, and sang “The A-Team” in front of everyone. That was the first song I ever learned.”

 

Clevenger: Is that the first instrument you ever learned to play?

 

McKelligon: I played trumpet in middle school. But I probably wouldn’t have gotten a guitar if it weren’t for my sister. She was the one who was always interested in music, which is what inspired me to get into it. She also plays guitar, but she mostly plays country music.

 

Clevenger: Do you have a specific musical style?

 

McKelligon: I would say it’s a mix of alternative-pop-hip-hop.

 

Clevenger: And do you write your own music?

 

McKelligon: Yes, I’ve been writing a lot of music, and have been recording songs since February 2020. I have two songs, which I post on SoundCloud.

 

Clevenger: Have you always been a singer, or is it a skill you have picked up since you started playing guitar?

 

McKelligon: I’ve definitely gotten better at singing over the past few years, but there was a time in my life, when I was a kid, that I wouldn’t sing. You could not get me to sing because I was pretty shy. Now, singing has turned into a way for me to express myself. It’s a very comfortable thing for me. 

 

Clevenger: But you don’t take choir at Jesuit?

 

McKelligon: I took choir my freshman year, as part of the Art Wheel. When I took the class, I was in the middle of trying to figure out how I really felt about music. I liked it, but I didn’t think of it as a passion yet. Over the past two years, though, it’s become my main hobby.

 

Clevenger: Ok, let’s talk about performing. Who do you perform for now? I know you put out that video in September. What made you want to do that?

 

McKelligon: I have performed at Coffeehouse. I did the last Coffeehouse of freshman year, which is when my sister was a senior. That was our last opportunity to do a duet, so we performed together. 

 

Clevenger: So you said you perform with your sister. Do you have anyone else that you sing or perform with?

 

McKelligon: I have friends who have similar interests as me, and we work on music together. [seniors] Aidan Azavedo, Max Barton, Alex Perussi, and Alex Hayes all help me with my music. They take beats from online, and rap over them. Alex and Andrew are the producers, so they work with the microphone, and whatever work comes along with producing. 

 

Clevenger: How many songs have you written?

 

McKelligon: I have a ton of unreleased songs that I’m working on, but I only have two that are out right now. I usually write my own songs. Sometimes I’ll collaborate with my friends. I made a studio in my basement, so that’s where we play.

 

Clevenger: How do you find the time to work on your music?

 

McKelligon: When I have sports, I go to practice after school, and then come home to record a part of a song. Whenever I can find the time. I usually do my homework later at night.

 

Clevenger: Are you a self-taught guitarist?

 

McKelligon: Yes, and it was hard to keep going. After a while, your fingers start to hurt. But I enjoyed music a lot, and it was my way of expressing myself. Sometimes, I don’t even realize I have a feeling inside me until I get it out into a song, and then listening back to the song, the lyrics are so much deeper than I thought. It almost gives me a reflection of myself. I mostly write about things that are going on in my life.

 

I feel like there is a lot of pressure to play a sport or be part of an activity that everyone else is participating in. I like finding my own way. There’s something that makes me happy and excited with myself when I do something that’s different from what other people are doing.

 

Clevenger: When did you start recording your music?

 

McKelligon: I used to use the Voice Memos app on my phone. I didn’t know how to produce or anyone that knew how to produce, so I just started playing guitar and singing, and recording it on my phone. I recorded my first song in January 2020. We recorded it in a closet.

 

I’ve put all my money into this, but my parents are really supportive. I show them my stuff, and they support both me and my sister. I have a few friends that I’ll show all my work to. I haven’t released very much material, so there isn’t a lot for people to base my stuff off of, but I’m a perfectionist, so if I’m going to release something new, I want it to be perfect.

 

My best stuff comes out when I’m having strong feelings. One of my songs, “The Way That You Are,” just came out of me after I was fed up with certain things that were happening in my life. Even though some of the words reflect my anger in that moment, it is probably my best lyrical song. 

 

Clevenger: Would you consider pursuing music as a career?

 

McKelligon: I mean, yeah, that’s the goal. I’ll go to college, and music probably won’t be my major, but it may be a side activity, because it is my true passion. My dream is performing.

 

Stay tuned for McKelligon’s new single, “The Day That I Realized,” coming soon to SoundCloud! You can listen to McKelligon’s other songs here: https://soundcloud.app.goo.gl/CwfVkAgf2aw779mM9

Senior Gregor McKelligon uses music to express himself.

 

 

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Celebrating Ms. Roxann Asp

Ms.+Roxann+Asp

Dorian Studios

Ms. Roxann Asp

 

Ms. Roxann Asp (Dorian Studios)

We celebrate the life of sophomore health teacher Roxann Asp (1971-2020), who passed away after a battle with cancer on November 30, 2020. The day after her passing, Jesuit administrators sent an email to the Jesuit community expressing their profound sadness.

“She was a natural teacher—organized, passionate, practical, and incredibly devoted to her students and athletes,” the email said.

A teacher, as well as a coach, Ms. Asp affected the lives of many young students. Ms. Asp came to Jesuit in 1996 to coach basketball, cross-country, and softball. She then joined the faculty as a biology and health teacher. Ms. Asp then left Jesuit in 2007 to teach at NAYA Many Nations Academy for Native American Youth, and returned to Jesuit in 2014.

To pay tribute to Ms. Asp, please attend Jesuit’s prayer service tonight at 6 p.m., where students and staff will take time to pray for Ms. Asp and her family.

Ms. Asp smiles while holding a puppy.
About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Opinion: Too much screen time hinders mental health and students’ ability to learn

A+girl+stares+at+her+screen+in+the+dark%2C+straining+her+eyes+as+she+types.

pxfuel.com

A girl stares at her screen in the dark, straining her eyes as she types.

From 8 a.m. to roughly 3 p.m.—almost 7 hours—students stare mindlessly at a screen while teachers attempt desperately to connect with them through bluelight pixels, instructing and making jokes in hopes of distracting kids from the mundanity of learning from home.

For the first few weeks of school, I listened to students give feedback to teachers on how they were faring during digital learning. The responses were not varied; most students confided that their eyes and heads hurt after looking at their iPad all day.

Even teachers were struggling to adjust. One of my own teachers shared that she began having migraines during class, and was requested by her doctor not to look at screens in a dark room, which causes her to strain her eyes.

A recent poll on jesuitnews.com.com showed that in a group of 132 people, 39 percent of voters spend between eight and 10 hours a day looking at a screen, including their phone. Even more shocking, 33 percent of voters spend more than 10 hours a day on a screen. Twenty percent of voters spend between five and seven hours onscreen, and only eight percent spend two to four hours onscreen.

According to May Recreation, too much screen time can have adverse effects on students’ academic performance.

“Too much screen time can impair brain structure and function,” the May Recreation team said. “Because children’s brains undergo so much change during their formative years, this excess screen time can be even more damaging. Academic success, social skills, even career success can all be negatively affected by excessive screen time.”

Additionally, Harvard University said “the growing human brain is constantly building neural connections while pruning away less-used ones, and digital media use plays an active role in that process. Much of what happens on screen provides “impoverished” stimulation of the developing brain compared to reality. Children need a diverse menu of online and offline experiences, including the chance to let their minds wander.”

Last school year, I wrote an article about living a week without using my phone. In the article, there was a brief overview of each day. The days shared a similar theme: I had more time to do other things because of decreased phone use.

Cutting down the time one spends on their phone will benefit academic performance, as well as better sleep and less mood swings, to which teenagers are already prone. However, even if one were to give up their phone entirely, there is still the obvious question of how to cut down on screen use when it is required for school.

School screen time, whether it be for actual classes or just for homework, is approaching eight hours. Half of my teachers are now going asynchronous on Mondays, and Tuesday through Friday, many of my teachers are not filling up the entire 80-minute class period, as they recognize most students are unable to focus for that long. For teachers that like to fill the almost-hour-and-a-half of class, it is still quite a bit of screen time for teens.

Advocating for more asynchronous classes is one option, though kids lose time to connect with classmates, and they will still need to complete the required classwork online.

Taking into account Harvard University’s research that students need a “diverse menu of online and offline experiences,” one idea would be to listen to a recording of the teacher’s voice with a few activities for them to complete.

In certain classes, such as environmental science, english, and art electives, a screen is not typically needed for activities.

For classes that would need a screen for research and further learning, such as history, core science, and math classes, short, 15-minute activities could be intermixed with 10-minute breaks, so students can rest their eyes, reducing their chance of contracting migraines.

There are ways in which teachers can adjust their curriculum to fit the needs of their students. There are also ways students can advocate for less screen time, as most teachers are open to suggestions and care about their students’ health.

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Crusader Comics: Giving Thanks

Charlie+Crusader+gives+thanks+for+the+year%2C+recounting+all+the+new+skills+he+has+picked+up+during+quarantine.

Steele

Charlie Crusader gives thanks for the year, recounting all the new skills he has picked up during quarantine.

Charlie Crusader gives thanks for the year, recounting all the new skills he has picked up during quarantine. (Steele Clevenger)
About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Administrators update parents on COVID-19

Administrators+update+parents+on+COVID-19

Parents were invited to attend an online webinar, during which Jesuit Principal Paul Hogan and President Tom Arndorfer discussed updates on the coronavirus pandemic, and how it affects the Jesuit High School community.

Hogan and Arndorfer began with a prayer for veterans, thanking them for their service. Following the prayer, Hogan and Arndorfer discussed the school’s plans regarding the coronavirus.

Arndorfer said he wishes that students were back on campus, as he feels that the social, academic, and emotional aspects Jesuit provides are best served in person. However, he said that the school will continue to make appropriate accommodations for those who wish to stay home or come to campus for extracurriculars.

For students to return to school, two measures, put in place by Oregon Governor Kate Brown, must be met. The first measure states that in Washington County there must only be 50 or less new COVID cases per day per 100,000 people in a two week period for students to return to school. Currently, that number is 190 new COVID cases per day per 100,000 people.

The second measure is the test positivity rate. Currently, in Washington County, the test positivity rate is 10.2 percent more than twice as high as the necessary percentage to return to school, which is five percent over a 14-day period.

According to Arndorfer, students and most teachers will be staying at home through semester one. Hogan reminded parents to keep their teens at home to protect those with underlying conditions.

Hogan and Arndorfer encouraged parents to ask questions during the webinar. One parent asked if there were any creative ways to bring the students back to campus.

Hogan said that although students will need to stay home for the next few weeks by order of the Governor, he says he hopes to move into a hybrid schedule later in the school year. As part of a hybrid schedule, half of the student body would attend school in person on certain days, and the other portion of the student body would attend school alternate days.

One parent asked: what is the administration planning for the senior class? The administration plans to offer the PSAT, ACT, and SAT tests for current juniors in semester two. Additionally, Hogan announced that seniors were working with Jesuit’s college advisors, and that those advisors would reach out to juniors beginning January 2021.

Semester exams, which are usually given in the final week of each semester, will occur during regular 80-minute class meetings. Teachers have been encouraged to develop a range of cumulative semester assessments that students can take remotely.

If students were to come back to campus, one parent asked, what would lunchtime look like? Hogan says that because students will need to remove their masks to eat, they may be spread out into large areas, such as Gedrose Center, and locations outside.

“We hope to face the problem of finding places for students to eat, as that would mean our students are back on campus where they belong,” Hogan said.

Regarding the Food Drive, the annual holiday event where the Jesuit community collects food for underprivileged families, faculty, staff, and students plan to meet on December 7 to drop off food. This will be one of a few drop-off dates, as the number of people on campus will be limited. The alumni food drive will also proceed this year, though food drop-off dates are still pending.

Sports are still taking place on the Jesuit campus, though Hogan and Arndorfer both believe academics are a higher priority. They hope that events, including sports, will take place in large-open spaces off campus or through a virtual setting.

To be on campus, students have their temperatures taken upon arrival to ensure that they are not sick. A new piece of technology called Capscann will assess the health of each student, evaluating any symptoms they may have, replacing the thermometer that is placed in front of a person’s forehead to gauge their temperature.

Sports allow for students to connect with one another without looking at a screen, but parents are still hoping to have their children back on campus. Some parents are signing a petition to bring kids back to school. They plan to send the petition to Governor Kate Brown. Hogan and Arndorfer encouraged parents to continue to try to influence politics, contact representatives, and let their voices be heard.

The two administrators recognize that keeping students out of school affects their mental health, and advocate for bringing students back to school as soon as it is safe. Administrators will continue to send out surveys to parents regarding concerns they have about school policies and what they would like to see in the coming months.

Both Hogan and Arndorfer stressed throughout their presentation the importance of following Centers for Disease Control and a Prevention guidelines, spending time connecting with those around them, and giving thanks for the teachers, faculty, and staff of Jesuit for their hard work during these difficult times.

For more information on COVID metrics, visit https://www.oregon.gov/ode/students-and-family/healthsafety/Pages/COVID19.aspx.

 

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Senior Tanner Olson is the November Artist of the Month

This+colored+pencil+self-portrait+was+created+Olson%E2%80%99s+junior+year.

Tanner Olson

This colored pencil self-portrait was created Olson’s junior year.

When you look at senior Tanner Olson’s artwork, you might surmise that he has been drawing since he learned how to hold a pencil. Unbelievably, Olson only started experimenting with art in sixth grade.

“It was eighth grade when I started taking art seriously,” Olson said. It was just fun to me, and what kicked it off was finding out about the Jesuit art program, and then having the opportunity to go meet with [art teacher] Miss Manning [to review my portfolio].”

Upon entering Jesuit’s art program, Olson learned to work with many new and different media and techniques, including linoleum block printing, clay, and pastels. Even now as an Art IV student, however, Olson contests that his favorite medium is still pencil.

“I think I’m best at realistic drawing in pencil because it was the first thing I was exposed to,” Olson said. “It’s the thing I enjoy doing the most.”

Olson describes his art style as “realistic,” drawing or painting portraits, random household items, or things he finds in nature. His next project, illustrating a series of nine different works, involves painting flowers.

“They’re all different types of flowers,” Olson said. “You can make a connection to people because we all look different, and have different things about us, but we also have similarities [like flowers].”

Open to experimenting with different media, Olson decided to use gouache, which he describes as a mixture of watercolor and acrylic paint, to create his flower series.

“I have been enjoying gouache recently. It’s just fun to play around with because it’s just water and acrylic paint,” Olson said.

When asked what the most challenging part of the Jesuit art program has been, Olson says that it has been difficult to try not to compare himself to other artists.

“I don’t want to feel like I’m making art for competition,” Olson said. “It doesn’t really feel great. I’d rather do art for fun or to express a deeper meaning.”

Like many artists, Olson is inspired by the work of fellow artists. Using social media, he browses through different works, combining some of the ideas he sees with his unique art style.

“Seeing other pieces on like Instagram and seeing other people’s art really inspires me,” Olson said. “A good portion of my art has a deeper meaning, like self-reflection or self-expression. I make a lot of self portrait pieces.”

So where did he get his artistic talent from?

“My grandma is a really good artist. She hasn’t taught me much, but maybe there’s something genetic,” Olson said.

Additionally, Olson offers sage advice on what it takes to be a great artist.

“I think a lot of people may not realize this, but I’d say art takes more time than it does skill. If you want something to look good, you’re gonna have to invest a lot of time into it,” Olson said.

Tanner Olson’s twin brother, senior Tyler Olson, describes his brother as artistic, quiet, and respectful.

“We can’t stay mad at each other,” Tyler Olson said. “If we ever fight, it never lasts more than an hour. He’s very understanding.”

Senior Samantha Le met Tanner Olson at Holy Trinity Elementary School, and have known each other since kindergarten. Le agrees that he has always been quiet, and, like Tyler Olson, knows he is respectful.

“I have known Tanner since kindergarten, but we didn’t become good friends until eighth grade,” Le said. “I would describe Tanner as kind, reserved, and selfless.”

Friend and Art IV peer senior Tori Nguyen met Tanner through close friends and through the Jesuit art program. Nguyen praises Tanner Olson’s work, highlighting his meaningful and thoughtful art process.

“Tanner draws very meticulous things or small things that draw your eye, or things that you wouldn’t maybe notice at first,” Nguyen said. “It’s all well thought out and deliberate.”

Does Tanner Olson see art in his future?

“I might minor in art. Maybe drawing and illustration. I also really do enjoy painting.”

Created his senior year, Olson was tasked with drawing a shoe in pencil as realistically as possible. (Tanner Olson)

 

Olson created this as a senior for the first art project of the year. (Tanner Olson)

 

This pencil drawing created by Olson was done not for an art project but for fun. (Tanner Olson)

 

Olson created this gouache piece for an art project junior year. (Tanner Olson)
About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Interview: Mr. Hahn on Running for Tigard City Council

History+teacher+Jerry+Hahn+is+pictured+next+to+his+opponents+who+ran+for+Tigard+City+Council+this+year.

tigardlife.com

History teacher Jerry Hahn is pictured next to his opponents who ran for Tigard City Council this year.

In honor of Veteran’s Day, I had the chance to interview history teacher and former veteran Jerry Hahn, who shared with me his experience of running for Tigard City Council this year. Even though the election is over and he did not receive a seat on the council, Hahn is positive that his involvement in the process is full of learning opportunities. Here was his interview:
Clevenger: Why did you decide to run?
Hahn: I saw the opening this summer, and there were two Tigard City Council seats open this year. I thought about ways in which I could be more civically engaged. I also thought I could learn a lot about the process of local government and how local governments function. Lastly, I wanted something I could model for my students [to show them ways to] be engaged, be community oriented, and be part of the solution.
Clevenger: Can you describe part of that process? What was the first step?
Hahn: The first step is getting on the ballot, and receiving at least 20 signatures from citizens who are registered to vote, mostly neighbors. I had to get enough signatures from people who live in Tigard, and then those signatures had to be validated. I went down to the Washington County Courthouse and paid a filing fee, which was $50. After getting signatures and filing, I was officially on the ballot.
Clevenger: What was the next step after getting on the ballot?
Hahn: People and institutions in the community want to know who’s out there, so my first invitation was from the Tigard Police Union. I got a tour of their station and talked to their union leaders. They asked me a lot of questions about my stance on different [issues]. As a union and an institution, they were trying to find the candidates that were the best suited for them. I didn’t get their endorsement, and I was a little surprised, but they wanted more experience. I was also granted an invitation to be interviewed by the League of Women Voters. The interview was on one of those back cable channels. I was also interviewed by the Tigard Times, which is the local paper.
Clevenger: If you were to be elected, what would your role be in the community?
Hahn: The Tigard City Council has a mayor, who runs the political nature of the city, and four city council members. One is the president, and the other three are council members. I would have been making pretty important decisions that affect the community. One of the bigger decisions for Tigard right now is the light rail system. The question is, ‘Does Tigard seek to have the light rail line extended to Tigard?’ I’m a big supporter [of the light rail]. There’s so much traffic, and I think the light rail helps with congestion.
Clevenger: Would you consider this process was more of a learning venture as opposed to a job application?
Hahn: I did do it to learn about the process, but I was serious: I wanted to be on the council. I’m not disappointed or crushed or sad [that I wasn’t elected], but I thought I could do something for this community.
Clevenger: What was the hardest part of the process?
Hahn: Nothing about it was hard. I thought it was very simple. I got a great deal of help from a woman named Carol Krager from City Hall who helped me through the process. The secretary for the councils, once I was an official candidate, shared with me the minutes of past meetings, and I was invited to get up to speed.
Clevenger: If somebody told you that they were going to run for city council what advice would you give them?
Hahn: Get yourself up to speed on some of the current issues in Tigard so you don’t get caught off guard in a discussion. Also, it costs $100 to put your information in the voter’s pamphlet, and wish I had done that.
Clevenger: What sort of restrictions did you have due to COVID-19?
Hahn: When I was out and about, or if I was going to have somebody sign a petition, I needed multiple pens and cleaning devices. Certainly, I was masked and socially distanced.
Clevenger: Did you receive any endorsements?
Hahn: Yes, from local businesses, but not from any institutions that I’m aware of.
Clevenger: What were the results of the election?
Hahn: Seven people ran for Tigard City, most of whom were from the business world. There was one incumbent (a person who currently holds an office but can run again), who received the most votes. There was also one non-incumbent (a person who does not currently hold office and is eligible to run) who won a seat. I received 1111 votes.
Clevenger: So the big question is, would you run again?

Hahn: I don’t know where I will be in a couple of years in terms of health, interest, etc. There are people I know who said that the next time, if or when I run, they will put up lawn signs or give me money.
Clevenger: What would you do differently next time?
Hahn: I would campaign, and spend some money. I would have lawn signs and make posters, and have businesses put up signs as well because name recognition in small areas is huge. A lot of people vote based on familiarity with a name.
Clevenger: Thank you so much.
Hahn: Thank you.

 

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

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