Jesuit Chronicle

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What is Social Distancing?

Social+Distancing

Steele Clevenger

Social Distancing

What is Social Distancing?

By Steele Clevenger

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With the coronavirus now forcing people to stay quarantined in their homes, the practice of social distancing is essential to stopping its spread.

Social distancing is a practice recommended by public health officials to stop or slow down the spread of contagious diseases,” says The California Department of Public Health (CDPH). “It requires the creation of physical space between individuals who may spread certain infectious diseases.”

There is a difference between social distancing, quarantine, and isolation. Quarantine refers to the isolation of people who may have been exposed to the disease but aren’t sick. Isolation refers to people who are sick being kept away from others to ensure no one else becomes sick.

Given the order from President Donald Trump to avoid groups of more than 10, as well as Oregon Governor Kate Brown’s requirement that students stay out of school for two weeks, it is safe to say that social distancing is an important step in hindering the coronavirus spread.

If one does not feel vulnerable to the rampant outbreak, which by now has closed schools, events, and office buildings around the world, Principal Paul Hogan said to remember those of us who are exposed.

“Some students may not understand why we are moving to online learning, since young people seem relatively unaffected by the coronavirus,” said Hogan. “With the other Catholic high schools in Portland, we are trying to stem the spread of the virus to vulnerable members of our community and prevent health care centers from being overwhelmed.”

Vox’s Kelsey Piper makes a strong argument for choosing to stay home as much as possible, inconvenient as it may seem, to help your fellow humans. “If you are healthy, you ought to take precautions because doing so can end up saving someone’s life,” she writes.

Here are some tips on social distancing:

One: Don’t feel forced to stay inside. It’s one thing to go to the mall with a group of friends. It’s another to go outside and get some fresh air. 

Two: Find something to do. If one is going to be trapped in the house for two weeks, one might as well have something to do. Read a book, knit a sweater, or even go for a walk.

Three: use things in moderation. The Newport Oregon Police Department has asked people not to call 9-1-1 in case they run out of toilet paper, so unless you have a year’s supply hidden in your basement, be conscious about how much to use.

Four: take care of yourself. Use proper hygiene. Eat well. Get exercise. The healthier one is, the better chance there is of stopping the spread of the virus.

Experts like Tara Smith, an epidemiologist at Kent State University, said the goal is to “[flatten] the epidemic curve’ — so that it’s not a big, sudden peak in cases, but it’s a more moderate plateau over time.”

With aggressive preventative measures, such as social distancing, the coronavirus can be stopped, and cases will very slowly begin to disappear.

Jesuit administrators have created videos for Jesuit students and staff informing them on some tips about social distancing, and reminding them that in these troubled times they are loved. 

About the Contributor
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

The Coronavirus is Here

The+Coronavirus+is+Here

The Coronavirus is Here

BY STEELE CLEVENGER

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For anyone not yet up on the latest coronavirus, it is within a large family of common viruses first discovered in the Hubei region of Wuhan province of China, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Other coronaviruses include SARS-Cov and MERS-Cov, both of which were previously seen in animals and humans.

The difference between a standard coronavirus and this novel COVID-19: a standard coronavirus does not involve a fever. A person may just come down with a cold or have a runny nose. COVID-19, however, can include a fever, and in some severe cases, pneumonia.

The virus has been named “SARS-CoV-2” and the disease it causes has been named “coronavirus disease 2019 (abbreviated “COVID-19)” (CDC). The Latin root corona, meaning “wreath” or “crown,” relates to the crown-shaped appearance of the viruses (Miriam Webster).

But what can be done? Mark Slifka, P.h.D., who developed a hydrogen peroxide-based vaccine technology at OHSU, is a professor at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. Slifka said the coronavirus has the potential to become more widespread.

“COVID-19 is a type of coronavirus only seen before in animals, and can be spread through respiratory contact,” he said. “Symptoms of the coronavirus are similar to those of the flu: fever, achiness, difficulty breathing, bad cold, and pneumonia.”

Slifka also says the fatality rate is fairly low, at 0.7 percent to 3 percent. “For people over the age of 80, however, there is a 14-15 percent fatality rate. For anyone under the age of 50, there is a very small chance of fatality, and no one under ten years old has died,” says Slifka.

Junior Grace Taylor, who has dealt with Crohn’s, a chronic autoimmune disease, since sixth grade, says that she must be extra cautious about sanitation.

“I heard about the coronavirus through the media. My first reaction was, ‘It doesn’t matter. It’s not going to affect me because it’s basically just the flu’,” says Taylor. “I’m a little more concerned now, because, with Crohn’s, if I get sick, it lasts much longer than if I didn’t have an autoimmune disease.”

Is there a vaccine for this rampant outbreak of coronavirus?

Slifka says that it usually takes 15-18 years to develop a vaccine due to the requirements of multiple clinical trials, manufacturing, testing, and revising phases of a vaccine… and that’s if everything goes right the first time around.

Luckily, with the help of modern science, Slifka and his team can use existing strands of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) to manufacture a vaccine, which could be ready in as little as two years, with a clinical trial in full swing within the next few months.

Slifka and his team at OHSU are preparing for the outbreak by setting up teams of experts to do research, preventative, and supportive care. Slifka himself is leading a team in a study about the virus, learning what measures might be taken in the event of multiple cases.

In the meantime, we can help prevent coronavirus from spreading by reading those pink signs pasted on the walls of Jesuit classrooms, which read, “wash your hands,” and “avoid handshaking.”

If you feel sick, stay home. You may not feel vulnerable to the disease, but people with compromised immune systems have a higher chance of contracting the virus, and keeping it longer, so think of them before you act in an unsanitary manner.

The Jesuit administration has decided to cancel all summer service and immersion trips. Principal Paul Hogan said he is constantly communicating with people in the community, including airport staff members, directors of projects outside of school, and the Oregon Health Authorities. Hogan also said he will keep the community up to date as often as possible.

“A new page on the Jesuit school website will serve as a central location for information about the virus and our plans for responding. Here you will find electronic archives of the communications sent to our families, health and wellness information, resources for digital learning, and more,” wrote Hogan in an email to students, parents, and staff on the afternoon of March 10.

On March 12, Hogan and Jesuit President Thomas Arndorfer announced that Jesuit would close its doors beginning Monday, March 16, and go to a remote learning model. Oregon Governor Kate Brown ordered all public schools to be closed until April 28.

When will we see the end of what the World Health Organization calls “a global pandemic?” Slifka says if this virus is anything like the SARS outbreak in 2003, it will continue to rage for four to five months before things go back to normal. 

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Don’t Eat That!

Lifestyle


By Steele Clevenger

Don’t Eat That!

Grace Kurilo is like any other junior girl: passionate about music, hard-working, texts her friends on a regular basis, and loves her family and her dog. But like 32 million people living in America (foodallergy.org), Kurilo lives with a food allergy.

“I have to check nutrition labels to make sure there are no nuts, but I’m okay with ‘processed in a facility with nuts.’ Kurilo said. “I’m lucky I don’t have a severe allergy.”

Dietary restrictions—including allergies and intolerance—can make eating out with friends and family, or even grabbing a snack from your pantry, challenging. They used to fly under the radar, but now it seems more and more people are claiming to be gluten free, grain free, or even vegan.

Restaurants are recognizing the influx of people with food intolerance, and responding with increased amounts of gluten free and/or dairy-free products. For example, restaurants, such as Harlow in Southeast Portland, boast a 100 percent vegetarian and gluten-free menu, and even notable ice-creameries, such as Salt-and-Straw, now offer customers dairy-free scoops.

But even with the seemingly increased amount of allergen-free food, many restaurants, especially prominent chain restaurants which seem to be around every corner, don’t provide much in terms of nutritional value.

In my interview with Director of Food Services Cynthia Clauson, it was evident that the JHS cafeteria is not funded adequately for premium nutrition. 

“The cafeteria did not evolve alongside the rest of the school, but [my team and I] do really well with what we can,” Clauson said. However, she is able to provide some of the meals she wants to students.

Clauson assumed the position of Director of Food Services three years ago. A lover of food, Clauson wants to swap out some of the less nutritional items on the menu, but she says that it is ultimately up to the students to make a healthy choice.

“We have a binder full of all the nutritional labels, so if someone with an allergy needs to know what is in a certain menu item, all they have to do is look in the binder,” says Clauson. “Usually, though, we only have a couple students who have allergies. If you have a severe allergy, we recommend you bring your own lunch.”

Jesuit should focus more on student wellness than it does. One of the most important parts of the day is a healthy meal.

“Your blood sugar decreases, which causes interruption in your ability to think straight,” says Haley Robinson, a Piedmont Healthcare clinical dietitian, on skipping a meal. “The brain uses glucose to run efficiently and if there is not enough glucose for the brain to use, your body does not function at 100 percent.”

Without the ability to focus, students do not learn, and thus are unable to achieve their full potential.

At Fayston Elementary School in Vermont, school lunches are what they call “farm to school,” a phrase used to describe sourcing food from local farmers to provide the freshest ingredients.

“Every other Tuesday, two cases of lettuce arrive from hydroponic greenhouses in the next-over town of Waitsfield,” said Cheryl Joslin, Fayston’s chef and food service program manager. “Weekly, a teacher who raises chickens brings in eggs, and she also supplies her family’s locally tapped maple syrup. [I] often substitute it for sugar in recipes” (Washington Post).

This “farm to school” movement has helped students to stay full during the day. According to an article written by the Harvard School of Public Health, “Children who eat healthier foods learn better and have fewer disciplinary issues.” 

I believe that in order for maximum student wellness and nutrition to be achieved, the cafeteria must evolve alongside the rest of the school, not just for the sake of those with dietary restrictions, but for the sake of all students who need a healthy meal to power their learning.

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About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

April Artist of the Month

April+Artist+of+the+Month

April Artist of the Month:

Miyako Barnett

Sophomore Aleena Barnett can still remember drawing with her sister, junior Miyako Barnett, when they were seven-year-olds: “We had a whole series of frogs that we drew together. I often pull out old drawings to make fun of with her.”

Miyako, a current member of the Art III class, says her first memory of creating art was of painting on rocks.

“It was a fun little activity we used to do when I was younger. Both of my parents are pretty artistic, and my grandpa was really into art, so they wanted us to know how to creatively express ourselves.”

Miyako’s parents also taught she and Aleena how to draw simple illustrations, such as people and flowers.

This practice of drawing people led to Miyako’s fascination with the human body.

“A lot of times, the people I paint are naked; I just feel like the human body is really beautiful. I paint androgynous people because I feel like it shouldn’t matter what someone’s gender is.”

Miyako’s art training in middle school came to a halt when her school ceased to provide an art class, yet the artist was determined to continue learning.

“There weren’t many art classes in middle school, so I mostly just watched YouTube videos, and [read] books [about art],” says Miyako. Outside of school, Miyako finds time to work on projects big and small, using her favorite media, acrylic paint and pencil.

Says Miyako, “[I work on art during] the weekend, and long breaks, like winter break or summer break, because during the school year I don’t have time outside of art class.”

Miyako has also been commissioned to do art projects for her community, from submitting her artwork to the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards, where she won a “gold key” for her acrylic rendition of the rapper Nipsey Hussle, to painting portraits of family members for their birthdays. 

Right now, Miyako is experimenting with clay in her Art III class, where teacher Sascha Manning shows her students how to sculpt, glaze, and fire.

“At first, I didn’t really have an idea of what I was going to do, so I just started building with clay randomly. I really didn’t like it because it was my first time [using] clay, but I like clay [now] because it’s so hands-on.”

Manning took notice of Miyako’s quiet but inspiring attitude.

“All art reflects the creator that made it. For Miyako, she’s a lovely person. She has the ability to show her strength and voice through her drawings and paintings. When I first met her, I saw a student whose art was needed by the world.”

Aleena, who is also an artist, describes her sister as inspiring, passionate, and confident.

“When I was younger I thought that [Miyako] was better than me, so I always tried to get to her level. She has always been a supportive sister, [telling] me that my art is just as good [as hers]. It’s comforting to know someone you look up to so much believes in your passion, too.”

Aleena says that although she and her sister do not draw together very much anymore, as Aleena puts it, “I like to go in her room and draw while she does whatever she wants to do.”

Does Miyako see a future in art?

“I might minor in it, but realistically, I don’t know if I could make money off of it. My style of art isn’t something people really buy.” says Miyako. “If I were to do a career in art, [I] would probably be [an art therapist].”

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NIPSEY HUSSLE PORTRAIT

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LOW-HANGING FRUIT

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THE GRIND

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

A Look Back at JUGs

Charlie+Crusader+receives+his+first+JUG+...+for+honking+in+class%21

Charlie Crusader receives his first JUG ... for honking in class!

A Look Back at JUGs

By Steele Clevenger

What is a JUG? A large container that holds liquids? Or a soul-crushing, nightmare-inducing yellow slip of paper sentencing you to intense labor and subjecting you to mockery?

According to Khalid Maxie, vice principal of academics and student life, JUG comes from a Latin term, juugum, meaning “to be burdened.”

“Most traditional Jesuit schools across the country use the term JUG, I’d say 90%,” said Maxie. “Other terms are ‘penance hall’ or ‘detention’.”

A common misnomer for JUG, the term ‘Justice Under God’ inaccurately describes the purpose of the JUG.

“It’s a myth that [grew] legs, and it’s now part of our normal vernacular,” said Maxie.

Former history teacher and vice principal at Jesuit High School Fr. Larry Robinson said that JUGs were first used at Jesuit the year of its founding in 1956, although it was not the first time this type of retribution had been seen in a Jesuit school.

“JUG is not only a Jesuit school tradition; plenty of parochial schools used it, the word and the system,” said Robinson.

For instance, in the early days of Jesuit, Robinson remembers that Fr. Joseph Perri, principal, had a “penchant for neatness,” and any student who was untidy received clean-up duty until the area was spotless along with a stern lecture on behavior.

In addition to JUGs and disciplinary lectures, spats and hacks, paddles used to smack misbehaving students, often went with receiving a JUG.

“Spats and hacks often went with a JUG early on. [It was] maybe more an indignity than a pain. Definitely out as of 1993,” said Robinson.

How did lunch, after-school and Saturday JUGs come to fruition?

Both Theology Teacher Greg Allen and Robinson say those ideas morphed over time depending on how offensive an action was.

Athletic Director Mike Hughes ‘79 recalls that when he attended Jesuit, a JUG meant doing custodial work.

“In the 1970s, a JUG often involved manual labor such as raking leaves in the fall, scraping gum off sidewalks, and walking around the campus emptying garbage cans.”

Added Allen: “It used to be fairly punitive back in the 1960s and ‘70s. That was shifted to more of a ‘do-something-around-the-school’ [punishment].”

According to Maxie, in the 2018-19 school year, students racked up 111 Saturday JUGs, 810 after-school JUGs, and 2,603 lunch JUGs. That’s 3,524 “do-something-around-the-school punishments” in total.

Maxie also wanted to make clear that he and his fellow administrators are not as heavy-handed with JUGs as some of the other Jesuit staff members.“

Contrary to belief, we don’t give the most JUGs,” said Maxie.

Who does?

“The librarians, probably,” he said.

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About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Snack Attack

Snack+Attack
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Microaggressions such as this are hurtful, damaging and problematic in a school environment.

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Crusader Comics: Gamboling Geese

Crusader+Comics%3A+Gamboling+Geese
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About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

March Artists of the Month

March+Artists+of+the+Month

March Artists of the Month

By Steele Clevenger, Staff Writer and Art Director


“They inspire me because they are so inspired. There’s so much joy and love and honest inspiration that it’s contagious.”

-Art Teacher Sascha Manning

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From left: Charlie Wallace, Ben Morich, Caz Barnum, Kevin Wisnewski, and Kyle Kneefel

When the talent abounds in your art class, how is a teacher to pick ONE artist of the month? Art IV teacher Sascha Manning has a solution: pick five.

Seniors Ben Morich, Kevin Wisnewski, Kyle Kneefel, Caz Barnum, and Charlie Wallace, who met in Manning’s Art I class freshman year, are all recipients of the title “March Artist of the Month.”

Casual and humorous, these five young men laughed while describing their favorite media.Said Morich: “Paint, acrylic.” Wisnewski echoed Morich’s enthusiasm. “I like pen a lot,” said Kneefel. “I do oil paint,” said Barnum. Wallace answered simply: “Spray  paint.”

Each artist finds inspiration in nature as well as their surroundings.

I find inspiration all around me, really. I find it in other people, and I find it in other people’s works because I’m always really impressed by [them],” said Kneefel.

So, how did their art careers begin? Barnum said, “I got started in art in middle school. I was doing little doodles and people would say ‘Oh, those are really good’.”

Wallace, Wisnewski, Kneefel, and Morich agreed that their stories were similar to Barnum’s. All took an interest in art during middle school, and eventually showed their art to Manning for a chance to enter Art I.

Years later, each artist still finds comfort in art, even during their hectic and stressful senior year. Outside of class, these talented young men find time to work on art projects on which they are passionate.

Wisnewski said, “Outside of class, I like to paint [on] shoes for people. I’ve been selling painted shoes since freshman year.”

Added Barnum: “It’s very hard for me to find time outside of school [to do art] because I’m doing a lot of stuff, but on big breaks I do art.”

Then, Manning chimed in with a question: “Did you ever have the sense that art is just for girls, or that you have to be a comic artist to fit in to the stereotype [that all male artists are graphic novelists.]?” to which the boys nodded.“

For me, there’s always been outside influences that say, ‘Your art has to be this way,’ and for a while I thought that way,” said Kneefel. “But as soon as I got into eighth grade and high school, it was like, ‘It’s my artwork. I can do whatever I want to do.’” 

The energy that these artists generate is contagious. Each brings life and vibrancy to their work.“They inspire me because they are so inspired,” said Manning. “There’s so much joy and love and honest inspiration that it’s contagious.

When asked how they would describe each other, Wallace said, “Kevin and Ben and Kyle and Caz are crazy.” Kneefel called Wallace a “hype beast.”

When asked if they had any stories they wanted to tell, Manning immediately said, “How about the great flood freshman year?”

There were audible groans from Kneefel (“Ugh, that was my best project!”) and exclamations of “Oh yeah!” from Wallace, Wisnewski, Barnum, and Morich.“

Because we had so much snow, and the [Performing Arts Center] roof is flat, we had a flood in here to where there was a good amount of water on the floor,” said Manning. “[The class] had already invested a good four weeks into their artwork, and the great flood took down the majority of their [acrylic paintings].”

This flood, which seems to have brought the artists together the way only a natural disaster can is something the artists and Manning will remember forever.

Do these artists see a future in art? The answer for all of them is yes.

Well, almost all of them.

Barnum seems to have a different agenda than the other artists.“I’ll still do art, but …” Barnum said. Manning then chimed in: “You know you want to be a history teacher,” she said. 

“Mr. Barnum,” said Wallace, at which all the boys laughed.

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BY KEVIN WISNEWSKI

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BY CAZ BARNUM

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BY CHARLIE WALLACE

Kevin Wisnewski creates both acrylic (left) and digital art.

Caz Barnum is fascinated by oil painted landscapes, which are inspired by famous artist Bob Ross.

Charlie Wallace’s favorite medium is spray paint.

About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

I gave up my phone for a week: here’s what happened

Dan Falkner
"Technology, especially the now ubiquitous iPhone, can have extremely negative effects on teenagers' mental health."

I gave up my phone for a week: here’s what happened

By Steele Clevenger

COMIC COURTESY STEELE CLEVENGER, STAFF WRITER AND ART DIRECTOR

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“Technology, especially the now ubiquitous iPhone, can have extremely negative effects on teenagers’ mental health.”


Ron Srigley, a professor at both Humber College and Laurentian University, was disappointed when his students failed a midterm test, though he wasn’t surprised. He suspected technology played a role in the failed exam.

“I asked them what they thought had gone wrong. A young woman put up her hand and said: ‘We don’t understand what the books say, sir. We don’t understand the words.’ So I offered them extra credit if they would give me their phones and write about living without them” (MIT Technology Review).

Jean Twenge, author of the book iGen, says “Many parents and educators worry that teen’s … social media and texting, has created a … generation prone to depression … Forty-six percent more 15-to-19-year-olds committed suicide in 2015 than in 2007, and two-and-a-half times more 12-to-14-year-olds killed themselves” (100, 110).

It is clear that technology, especially the now ubiquitous iPhone, can have extremely negative effects on teenagers’ mental health.

Curious as to the effects of how giving up technology would affect my health, I decided to embark on a one week no-phone journey. The rules? No smartphone use for one week. iPads are allowed for homework only. Here’s what I found out:

Day One: It felt a little weird not checking my phone for texts in the morning, but the first day was not challenging. Most of the school day was spent on my iPad, so I didn’t feel like I was missing anything.

Day Two: Another comfortable day without my phone. Communication is tricky, though. I had an appointment today, and when my mom didn’t show up on time, I started to panic. However, my mom picked me up, and I was on time for my appointment.

Day Three: Ok, I cheated a little bit today: I used my iPad for something other than homework. There are so many times during the day I feel like looking up the answers to life’s mysteries. “Did Betty White go to jail?” was a question I answered using my iPad.

Day Four: Today was a work day, meaning I had no time to use technology. I have begun to notice how much sleep I am getting now; 9:30 pm was my bedtime today, as opposed to my usual 11:30 pm.

Day Five: Ah, Saturday. I went to the Farmer’s Market with my dad. Again, there was no time to stare at a screen, and I felt like I had so much more time to talk to my family.

Day Six: I spent most of my day cooking and relaxing. My head was clear and my energy was high. I finished my second book this week, and took a walk with my mom.

Day Seven: Over the course of this challenge, I have realized that I spend so much time on technology that I forget how much I have been given. I drew more, read more, and slept more, making me feel healthier and more fulfilled.

My friend, and fellow reporter, Jayla Lowery, who took part in this week-long challenge with me, also found herself with lots of empty time.

“I worked out, I went for a walk, I went for a bike ride; I did a lot of stuff I usually wouldn’t do [if I’d had my phone],” said Lowery. “I had fewer migraines [and] I felt like I could get a lot more work done.”

Overall, we both agreed we would take part in this challenge again. Though communication with friends and family was different, everything could be coordinated ahead of time, and neither of us felt like we were missing anything when we put our phones away.

If iPhones get in the way of reaching our potentials, do iPads have similar disadvantages?

In 2014, Jesuit introduced iPads to students. 

“We try to adapt to the evolving ways kids use technology,” said Principal Paul Hogan. “When cellphones began to proliferate, [administrators] said, ‘You can’t just have them out at any time.”

Hogan said that although iPads can be distracting for some students, he says giving students access to information and connection with the school and their peers outweighs the negative effects of a screen. 

Said Hogan, “Some people argue an iPad is just a glorified phone. I think there’s more use to it.” 

So, how about a “No iPad Day?”

Said Hogan, “I think it’s a great idea, [however] we would need to have plenty of notice.”

About the Contributor
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Crusader Comics: Christmas Crusader

Crusader+Comics%3A+Christmas+Crusader
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About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Dear Charlie

Dear Charlie

An advice Column by Steele Clevenger

Dear Charlie,

I am a senior, and I strive to receive above-average grades. But with college application due dates approaching, I can’t help but feel anxious. 

I am in the process of writing college applications, but I often feel sick when I write them. What if I don’t get accepted into the college I want? What if this application changes the course of my entire life?

I just want to feel relaxed when thinking about my future. What should I do?

Signed,

Stressed and Depressed

Dear Stressed and Depressed,

I know it can be hard to complete a task when you feel stressed; everything becomes dull and dismal, leading you to feel unhappy.

When talking to biology teacher Lara Shamieh about student stress, she said, “Kids are always pressured to do too much. There’s no time for kids to just be kids and have fun anymore.”

Said Shamieh, “Write down five things each day about [yourself] that you are thankful for,” a technique used to cope with stress and feelings of insufficiency.

“It’s pretty amazing, when you [ask] someone to look for the good in themselves, how much they can find.”

Scripture teacher Christina Barry also suggests positive self-talk to determine future happiness and success.

“[There is] this pressure to be the perfect version of yourself, which doesn’t exist. Notice the voice of truth in [your] life instead of listening to negative voices that [get you down].”

Remember to be kind to yourself and let life run its course. Everything will work itself out in the end.

Signed, 

Charlie

Dear Charlie

I am a sophomore enjoying my classes, and my teachers are intelligent and helpful. However, my social life seems to have disappeared. I have some friends who I see in the hallways and eat lunch with, but I don’t feel like any of them know me.

My relationships with my friends are fading, and the loneliness is affecting everything I do. Please help!

Signed,

Lonely

Dear Lonely,

If you feel your relationships are stale, scripture teacher Christina Barry recommends writing down your feelings in a journal, as well as talking out your problems with a trusted friend.

“If [you] surround [yourself] with healthy relationships and positive people, it will affect who [you] become,” said Barry.

English teacher Konrad Reinhardt said teachers, coaches, and parents are quick to jump in and solve problems instead of listening. He said allowing students to talk about their problems and then deciding how to solve them on their own empowers them.

Talk to a trusted adult about your feelings of loneliness, whether that be a teacher, counselor, or coach. Perhaps in talking about you problems you can devise a solution to help manage the situation, or the person you talk to may be able to provide advice on how to cope.

Signed, 

Charlie

Charlie encourages you to talk to a counselor or trusted adult if you have any concerns.

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About the Writer
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Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Crusader Comics: Problems of a Perfectionist

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About the Writer
Photo of Steele Clevenger
Steele Clevenger, Editor and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

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