Jesuit Chronicle

Live Theater During the Pandemic: Jesuit Presents Godspell!

Principal members of the Godspell cast pose for a group photo after their closing night.

James Miller

Principal members of the Godspell cast pose for a group photo after their closing night.

It’s not easy producing live theater in the age of social distancing, but drama directors Jeff Hall and Elaine Kloser have been working hard with students to put on a production of “Godspell” in a new digital format. 

The show was made up of a cast of about 34 actors, ten students performed live onstage and the rest performed on the screen through a variety of projections and special effects. In this new format, new opportunities, as well challenges presented themselves.

“It’s been really fun to get creative in a way that we haven’t before when [trying] to figure out how we can create a show and bring a larger group of people together in a time when we can’t all be in person,” said junior Ava Maloco. “I think it’s pretty exciting when everything is a little up in the air and you’re not sure exactly how things are going to turn out.” 

Behind the scenes was a tech crew of 40 students who had been working tirelessly to ensure a smooth run.

“The tech crew has been preparing for Godspell by setting up not only what we normally use for a show, like lights, microphones, but we’ve also been creating a huge amount of video projections featuring the ensembles, in addition to all the equipment needed to stream Godspell to everyone watching from home,” said senior tech crew member Luke Motschenbacher. “During the actual performances, the tech crew will be running lights, projections, microphones and sound effects, the cameras, and much more.”

The show follows a bit of an unconventional plot line, illustrating the story of Jesus’ life through parables, songs, and dancing. The message of the show, however, is really up to your own interpretation.

The show basically follows Jesus’s life, but I’d say that in a more abstract way the show is just about teaching valuable lessons, especially about community, in a more entertaining way,” said Ava Maloco. 

Many of the virtual ensemble and principal cast members agree that Godspell is centered around a common theme of community.

It’s pretty difficult to really understand what Godspell is about. I know many people think it’s a huge Christian and religious show, but I disagree,” said junior James Miller, who played Jesus. “Godspell tells a very simple but important story: a group of strangers being united through song, celebration, and, most importantly love.”

The show premiered on Friday, Dec. 4, with two more performances that followed Saturday and Sunday. Over 900 viewers streamed the show online, as well as a small live audience of family members who were able to watch the show live. 

“I think livestreaming the show really opened more doors than it closed,” said junior Kate Goddard. “My grandparents live in Ireland, so if we were to do the show [in person] they wouldn’t have been able to see it. But even with the eight hour time difference they were able to see me and they said it was the highlight of their long year in isolation.”

Godspell is an incredibly touching story, and although the original show has been performed at Jesuit before in 1970 and 1995, it remains a show that reflects an important message relevant to the modern age.

“I think [Godspell] also relates to the times we are living in right now. There is a song called “Beautiful City” near the end of the show before Jesus is killed, and the lyrics mention how we can slowly start to recover and [that] things may not get better right away, but they will eventually,” said junior Theron Abel. “This is such an important message for us right now, living in these tough times, and we have to realize that things will get better.”

About the Writer
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Chase Kerman, Junior Executive Editor

Chase Kerman, a Junior at Jesuit High School, is excited to explore Journalism and grow as a writer in her first year taking the class. At Jesuit, Chase...

Vacationing plans change due to Covid-19

Vacationing+plans+change+due+to+Covid-19

As Covid-19 cases increase, students are altering their traditional vacation plans during the holiday season.

    As the holidays swiftly approach, the season for students to visit their family and spend time with those they love is very near. However, travel proves especially difficult and risky due to the increasing number Covid-19 cases. Cases are skyrocketing, with an average of 952 cases per day in Oregon alone, an increase of 83% from the past two weeks (The New York Times). 

    Students have been forced to reschedule their vacations, but some are willing to take the risk to spend time with family. While some students may be pushing their vacations back, others are taking advantage of the extra week off of school.

    “The plans changed because I was supposed to go to Palm Desert last spring, but it changed to this Thanksgiving,” senior Annie Landgraf said. “My mom really values family time, and this may be the only opportunity we can all get together.”
    In addition to the change in travel schedules, activities and destinations within vacations may be limited due to Covid-19 restrictions in other countries and territories. Senior Emma Cordova plans to travel to Quito, Ecuador and spend a month with her family.

    “ Whenever we talked about going on a trip to Ecuador we talked about touring around,” Cordova said. “So I’m going to Quito, which is the capital, but in normal circumstances I would’ve gone to Riobamba to see where [my dad] grew up…rather than just knowing that one area. But because of Covid I’m not going to do that…But I’m pretty much staying in that suburb and staying in that general vicinity rather than taking a train around on the weekends.”

    Furthermore, students are taking extra precautionary measures if they do decide to travel to decrease chances of contracting the virus. This includes quarantining before or after they travel, taking tests to ensure  safety, and more.

    “We’re getting tested before we leave and upon arrival which follows the guidelines of the state of Hawaii,” senior Damon Grim said. “We are also quarantining for 72 hours before departure, and we will be getting tested upon return to Oregon.”

    Although quarantining is the responsible option, students may simply be limiting their time with others and increasing social distancing practices before departing for vacation. Cordova chose to take this route, as well as multiple tests before and after her vacation. 

    “I’ve been still hanging out with my friends, but in reality that’s been like two or three people throughout the past few weeks…So I’m not quarantining like I was during lockdown, but I’m also trying not to hang out with people I haven’t really hung out with a ton.”

    While vacation will serve as a time of rest for students, those traveling during school days will need to find a balance between school, fun , rest, family time, and other obligations. This can prove especially difficult, as those traveling farther will be faced with a time-zone barrier, depending on the destination.

    “Hawaii’s only two hours behind so I’ll probably do [school] unless I don’t feel like it – I haven’t totally decided yet,” Grim said. “I might go most days but probably not all. Honestly I need to enjoy vacation too, so I probably will take some time off, but that long Thanksgiving break is definitely helpful. It’s pretty easy to do school though because it’s online, and you can do it from anywhere.”

About the Writer
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Scout Jacobs, Associate Editor-in-Chief







Scout Jacobs is a managing editor for the Jesuit Chronicles at Jesuit High School. As a senior in high school, this is her third year doing...

Everything You Need To Know About Jesuit’s 2020 Christmas Food Drive

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Image courtesy of KATU News, annotation courtesy of Avni Sharma.

It’s nearing that time of year. 

The season of hot cocoa, Santa Claus themed greeting cards, and the “Home Alone” Series. With only a few weeks left until December, the 12 month wait for jingle bells and candy canes is almost over. But to Jesuit students, nothing screams Christmas more than the annual Food Drive. 

In the past, the annual Food Drive has been an opportunity for students to gather and organize the cans, boxes, and cases of non-perishable food in a joyous and welcoming environment. Mariah Carey’s “All I Want For Christmas” blasts on the speakers as students shuffle around the cafeteria, laughing as they sort food with their friends. 

“I remember everyone would carry bags of cans and have this mass exodus from their classes,” junior Charlene de La Paz said. “It was really fun.” 

It was the perfect way to celebrate Christmas and relax after a long semester, while also helping those in need. Even now with COVID-19 limiting certain school related events, students look forward to participating in the 2020 Food Drive. 

“I’m excited that we can continue the tradition at Jesuit in a way that will keep everyone safe and healthy,” Director of Arrupe Center for Justice Andrea Casey said. “This year, we are still committed to those goals.” 

So yes, the Food Drive is still happening. That being said, the format will be significantly different from previous years. According to Ms. Casey, Jesuit plans to focus their efforts in three areas:

  1. Purchasing grocery gift cards through Jesuit’s website or Venmo. Jesuit’s partners have requested to not give food boxes this year, but to give gift cards and raise money instead. Jesuit’s goal is to raise at least 250 $50 gift cards.  
  2. Dropping non-perishable food off at campus. Students will be given a specific day to make your donation, to be as safe and socially distanced as possible. The food donated will go to St. Andrew and St. Cecelia Catholic Church Pantries. By the end of the Food Drive, the pantries should be stocked for many months to come. 
  3. Sponsoring specific families with grocery gift cards and presents. Students will be able to make a group with friends or family to sponsor a family. The group will be responsible for calling the family to find out what gifts their sponsored family would like, and will purchase the desired gifts along with wrapping supplies. Each person in the group will contribute $25 per person. It is important that the gift should not be wrapped, since the parents will wrap the presents themselves. Delivery will happen on Dec. 17th, between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m.

Other significant changes have also been made. Instead of having a single day to compile and deliver food, the 2020 Food Drive will happen throughout Dec. 2nd-17th. 

Though the Food Drive seems very different this year, Jesuit strives to help families battling with food insecurity while giving an opportunity for students to come together and bond in the name of Christmas. 

“Jesuit is handling the food drive very well this year,” junior Keya Pandya said. “Although it cannot be the same as it was in previous years, Jesuit is doing a great job of keeping the occasion joyous and exciting.”

About the Writer
Photo of Avni Sharma
Avni Sharma, Staff Writer

Avni Sharma is a current sophomore at Jesuit High School. She enjoys writing about a wide variety of topics, from music reviews to current politics. Though...

Trunk Or Treat!: Halloween Drive Through

Graphic Design by Senior Ellen Haney

Graphic Design by Senior Ellen Haney

This Halloween, student government is helping Jesuit students get into the spooky spirit with the first ever Trunk Or Treat!: Halloween Drive Through event. The event will run from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on October 31st with separate time slots for each grade level, and take place in the Cronin parking lot on campus. Freshmen and Edison students can participate from 11-12 p.m., Sophomores and Edison students from 12-1 p.m., Juniors from 1-2 p.m., and Seniors can arrive anytime from 2-3 p.m. 

At this event, students will have a chance to drive through festive Halloween decorations and get some candy from student government members along with a few teachers. Students will also have an option to donate to the Blanchet House Winterpack Kits Drive as they drive past a designated donation station. At the end of the drive, students will have a socially distanced photo opportunity.

Members of student government will be visiting campus in small cohorts this week to begin preparing for the event, setting up decorations in the Cronin lot as well as bagging up candy to safely deliver to students.

 Because large gatherings and many Halloween festivities are limited due to the COVID-19 pandemic, student government has organized this event to hopefully help bring a sense of community to the students during this holiday. 

About the Writer
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Chase Kerman, Junior Executive Editor

Chase Kerman, a Junior at Jesuit High School, is excited to explore Journalism and grow as a writer in her first year taking the class. At Jesuit, Chase...

Freshman Day Retreat in Person

Freshman+Gather+on+Cronin+Field+to+Participate+in+Day+Retreat.+Photo+Curtsey+Gwynne+Olson

Freshman Gather on Cronin Field to Participate in Day Retreat. Photo Curtsey Gwynne Olson

On October 19, the freshman class participated in the Freshman Day Retreat in person. The retreat took place over three separate sessions where students, organized by their home room teacher, arrived at various times throughout the day. Because of COVID restrictions, the retreat could not take place in the Smith Gym like it typically would but instead on Cronin Field. 

 

Months of planning were put into making the Freshman Day Retreat. Campus Minister Don Clarke along with the assistance of English teacher Konrad Reinhardt planned, altered, and insured the retreat followed CDC guidelines frequently. 

 

Retreats at Jesuit are always student led. Those who have experienced the retreat before are too pass their wisdom on to those students who have not. For this retreat, seniors were the student leads. 

 

“It works better when it is student led,” Mr. Reinhardt said. “Especially a senior to a freshman because you are their finish line. You are what they want to be when they are done with their four years here.”

 

On the day of the retreat, students arrived one group at a time where they checked in at their specific gate, had their temperature taken, given hand sanitizer, and finally instructed to sit in their assigned area. This was the first time the freshman had been on campus at the same time and, for some, the first time ever seeing their classmates outside of a screen. 

 

“I knew a couple of people coming into Jesuit but my home room was full of unfamiliar faces,” freshman Avery Fritz said. “It was super cool to be able to actually be able to interact with my classmates even though we could not be super close. It just made me excited for when I will get to go back to school”. 

 

The retreat held as many of the same activities as possible from the following years, though many were not within the COVID-19 restrictions. Students learned new songs, participated in Bible trivia, listened to choir singing, and of course, participated in the infamous Rock Paper Scissors tournament. 

 

“I still remember the Rock Paper Scissors tournament from my freshman year,” senior lead KJ Tinsley said. “It was such a fun way to bring us together as a class and I could tell it was doing the same thing with this class, no matter how different it was”.

 

The final part of the retreat was student talks and interaction. Each small group consisted of two senior leads along with a home room class of freshman. The small group started off with a couple ice breakers such as “what is your favorite comfort food,” following with senior talks. The first talk given surrounded friendships, specifically detailing friendships during quarantine. Students were then given questions of interpretation to discuss with a classmate and eventually share with the group. Freshman got to know new classmates while getting advice from their two senior leads. 

 

“As much as I loved the Rock Paper Scissors tournament, my favorite part of the retreat was definitely the senior talks,” Fritz said. “It was cool to hear about their lives when they were freshmen, it made high school seem a whole lot less scary”. 

 

This retreat could not have been done without Mr. Reinhardt and especially Mr. Clarke. Over the last weeks, Mr. Clarke has been fine tuning this retreat so everyone who wanted to participate would be able too. 

 

“Overall I think the retreat was a success,” Mr. Reinhardt said. “ I texted a couple of the freshman parents just saying ‘how did they come home?’ And they said they came home with smiles on their faces”.

About the Writer
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Gwynne Olson, Executive Editor-at-Large and Social Media Executive

Gwynne Olson is a junior staff writer for the Jesuit Chronicle. Gwynne is the youngest of two. Brooke, her older sister, is a recent graduate from the...

Take Part in Jesuit’s 21 Day Racial Awareness Challenge

Take+Part+in+Jesuit%E2%80%99s+21+Day+Racial+Awareness+Challenge

Beginning November 2nd, the Diversity Equity and Inclusion Office will challenge the Jesuit community to engage in a 21 day event in an effort to become a more culturally aware and Anti-racist community.

The Ignatian Racial Equity Challenge will give students the opportunity to understand the realities of racial injustice endured by people of color throughout the nation. This challenge will provide a unique look into the lives of individuals facing racial injustice, and will help participants explore racial equity in light of the Jesuit faith and Ignatian Spirituality.

Participants will receive daily emails with a challenge beginning November 2nd and ending November 22nd. Sign up by October 30th by clicking this link.

About the Writer
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Steele Clevenger, Editor-in-Chief and Creative Director

Sarcastic. Artistic. Enthusiastic. These are three words Steele Clevenger would use to describe herself. A senior at Jesuit High School and a veteran journalism...

Crowded in a Virtual Classroom, Yet Feeling Alone: The Necessity of In-Person School for Freshmen

Students%2C+especially+those+new+to+the+high+school%2C+may+be+feeling+overloaded+both+academically+and+emotionally.%0A

Avni Sharma

Students, especially those new to the high school, may be feeling overloaded both academically and emotionally.

After seven months of quarantine, online learning has become the new norm. To upperclassmen, the feeling of drowsily walking to class in the morning, catching the sweet aroma of cinnamon rolls on Wednesdays, and hearing the loud chatter at lunch seems nothing but a distant, nostalgic memory. For freshmen, however, the chances of sharing the same experiences and sentiments this year seem unlikely –  And the negative effects of online schooling are becoming clear. 

Even in normal circumstances, the transition from middle to high school can be mentally and emotionally taxing. Fulfilling deadlines, getting used to new expectations, maintaining extracurriculars, and the thought of nearing adulthood are all arduous tasks that overwhelm students on any grade level. 

As freshmen, students gently ease into the new environment, but quickly familiarize themselves with the hectic lifestyle and academic rhythm of high school. The aid given by a teacher, counselor, or other staff through physical classes helps a student adapt faster. With the restriction of a remote-learning environment, freshmen are struggling to academically compensate for the lack of in-person instruction. 

“It feels like it’s harder to ask questions and understand new concepts,” freshman Sonali Kumar says. 

Academics isn’t the only aspect of school in jeopardy. 

Building relationships online can be a daunting prospect for many. It’s especially difficult for introverted students, who already face difficulty making friends.  

“Half the time I don’t even know the people in my class well enough besides hearing them answer questions,” an anonymous freshman states, “I can’t even think about asking for contact info or saying “hey, wanna do this?” because it feels awkward, too—How  would you ask them for things like that?”

Usually, this is where Jesuit Ambassadors often step in to play the “big-brother role”, by organizing freshman-focused activities such as dances, games, and retreats to help build relationships and encourage friendships. But with the absence of these crucial in-person events, simply conversing online may not be enough to establish a significant bond between students.

During stressful times, upperclassmen often reminisce and reflect on important memories with their friends at Jesuit as a means of motivation and hope for the future. 

“I remember seeing my friends after school everyday,” senior Gwynne Olson recalls, “I can’t wait to come back and maintain the friendships I took three years to make.” 

But how can people even make those important memories? According to Micah Murray, an associate professor of biology at the University of Lausanne, the “multi-sensory events – those which engage sight and hearing – enhance memories and create more vivid memories.” 

Without associating senses (auditory, olfactory, visual, etc.) to one’s experiences, the development of a memory is compromised. In other words, one has to be physically present in order to have the memory stick and become meaningful. That’s why students bond over food in the cafeteria, in after-school sports activities, and in classrooms.

It also explains why people crave human-to-human contact in isolation, because they no longer have access to hearing, seeing, physically touching things, which helps them connect with others on a deeper level. Because of this, the Class of 2024 could potentially have one of the most underdeveloped relationships with each other than any other previous graduating class at Jesuit. 

Jesuit’s prudent efforts to provide in-person socializing opportunities are praiseworthy, including the upcoming Freshman Day Retreat on October 19th. Students are looking forward to meeting fellow freshmen and becoming acquainted with the school’s environment. Even a small success from this early effort could ultimately prove hugely promising toward a fuller and richer school experience for all.

About the Contributor
Photo of Avni Sharma
Avni Sharma, Staff Writer

Avni Sharma is a current sophomore at Jesuit High School. She enjoys writing about a wide variety of topics, from music reviews to current politics. Though...

CCA Walks for Joy

Senior+Roxana+Abtin+Enjoying+the+CCA+Walks+For+Joy+with+her+Dog.+Photo+Curtsey+Roxana+Abtin

Senior Roxana Abtin Enjoying the CCA Walks For Joy with her Dog. Photo Curtsey Roxana Abtin

Jesuit and the Children’s Cancer Association have been partners for 22 years. It all started at Doernbecher Children’s Hospital 27 years ago when two young girls named Melissa Zimel ‘01 and Alexandra Ellis shared a room. Sadly, only one of the two girls survived their battle with cancer; Alexandra passed away at the young age of five. Her mother, Regina, was inspired to start a charity in her memory to help young cancer patients live a more joyful life through friendship, joy and music. This was the beginning of the Alexandra Ellis Memorial Children’s Cancer Association(AEMCCA). 

 

When Melissa entered Jesuit High School in 1997 as a freshman, she knocked on Academic Vice Principal Paul Hogan’s door and told him about the wondrous things the AEMCCA  had done for her and other children, hoping Mr. Hogan could instigate Jesuit support for the organization. He did. The school, along with the leadership of Melissa, organized the first Fat Daddy Ball rock concerts at the Crystal Ballroom, in support of what was soon  the Children’s Cancer Association (CCA). 

 

Four years later, Jesuit decided that throwing rock concerts so close to graduation was a bit much for students, so they participated in the first ever Walk for Joy. The Walk for Joy is a fundraiser in which the six Portland Catholic schools, Jesuit, Central Catholic, De La Salle North Catholic, Valley Catholic, La Salle, and Saint Mary’s Academy, walk together to raise money, show support, and spread awareness for CCA. While the CCA Walk currently operates smoothly, the first walks were not as glamorous. 

 

The first Jesuit-only walk was a 19-mile trek, which was difficult for many participants. For the next ten years the walk became the last six miles of the Portland Marathon route.  

 

The latest version of the  Walk for Joy began when four sophomores, Ruby Gray ‘17, Tim Haarmaan ‘17, Carli Wood ‘17, and McCall Phillips ‘17 came to Principal Paul Hogan’s office in hopes of expanding the walk to incorporate rival school Central Catholic. The walk served as a branch to bring the schools together outside of athletic and academic rivalries while raising money to support CCA.

 

As the Walk continued over the years, it evolved. Instead of just two schools participating, all six of the Catholic schools walked together in 2017 and congregated for a Mass at Sellwood Park.

 

The Walk for Joy became a huge success over the years, raising money and creating new relationships between schools.

 

Sadly, due to Covid-19 and social distancing restrictions, the Walk for Joy was forced to become all-virtual. Meetings started in late May to discuss planning the Walk and how it could carry on in the age of COVID.

 

The final plan was for a student-led Coffeehouse to take place completely virtual on the night of September 26th, and the following morning of the 27th would be Mass hosted by Central Catholic, with all six schools attending. Immediately following the mass, students and their families were encouraged to go outside and do their own, now called “Walks for Joy,” while dressed in purple and sharing their photos via social media. 

 

The excitement surrounding the Walks for Joy spread during the second week of school. Each school created a “hype” video to be played during a virtual assembly to excite students and introduce a more serious message from CCA founder, Regina Elis.  In addition, on Monday, September 14, Jesuit held its annual brown bag meeting over zoom led by senior student lead Gwynne Olson. The meeting was a success, teaching almost 100 students how to create fundraising pages, and reach out to donors. 

 

Within two weeks, not only did Jesuit reach the goal of 10,000 dollars, but surpassed it by over 5,000 dollars. So far, the schools raised almost 50,000 dollars. 

 

The Coffeehouse included performances by the students of all six schools. The Jesuit emcees of the night were senior Alannah Connolly and senior Mackenzie Jamies and student performers included senior Gregor McKelligon, and junior Denyse Gallardo. Supporting the musicians were technicians senior Grace Sopko and senior Luke Motschenbacher. Overall, the students were a hit, but they were not the only music performers invited to play that night. After the event, the world renowned Lumineers performed some of their hit songs. 

 

The next morning students woke up early for 10 a.m. Mass. With speakers from all six of the schools, a beautiful service was produced. The Mass was presided by Fr. David Shaw from Central Catholic and Fr. Pat Couture from Jesuit, with student reflections by junior Mary Lou Lux from Valley Catholic, Gwynne Olson from Jesuit, and junior Emma Watson from Central Catholic. The service was concluded with a reflection from Regina Ellis. 

 

Following Mass, students were encouraged to go out and walk with their families. Though the walk was significantly different from past walks, it was still greatly embraced by many students. 

 

“I loved the CCA Walk for Joy the previous years I participated because I got to walk with my classmates,” senior Roxana Abtin explained. “However, this year I really enjoyed being able to walk with my family.”

 

Looking back, the weekend was a complete success. Students were as involved this year as they have been in the previous years and had an amazing time. This weekend seemed impossible when planning began in April but ended up being amazing thanks to everyone who pitched in. 

 

“CCA, like a lot of charities, is hurting in the age of COVID-19 because they do most of their fundraising at events.” Principal Hogan said. “ My view was that things went astonishingly well. We could very well have just said,’Yeah, you know what, this is not going to work this year. We can’t gather everyone in the Saint Mary’s gym.how are we going to have a Mass?’ In the end, I’m super grateful that students did not give up on it and I am so proud of our Catholic school student leaders!”

 

About the Writer
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Gwynne Olson, Executive Editor-at-Large and Social Media Executive

Gwynne Olson is a junior staff writer for the Jesuit Chronicle. Gwynne is the youngest of two. Brooke, her older sister, is a recent graduate from the...

Encounter-less Seniors

March+Co-ed+Encounter+students+enjoying+the+Mackenzie+River%E2%80%99s+company.+Courtesy+of+Don+Clarke.
Senior Emily O’Connor and fellow October Women’s Encounter students. Courtesy of Emily O’Connor.
March Co-ed Encounter students enjoying the Mackenzie River’s company. Courtesy of Don Clarke.

The Encounter is a memorable weekend that deeply resonates with most students, however 75 seniors were not able to experience Jesuit’s junior Encounter due to the Coronavirus. Both the April Women’s Encounter and April Co-Ed Encounter were canceled last spring in hopes of rescheduling in the fall. 

“The encounter is such a central part of the Jesuit experience and I’ve heard so many people say it’s their favorite Jesuit memory,” senior Emily O’Connor, a participant in the 2019 October Women’s Encounter said. “I’ve seen people come back from their encounter with so much love and positivity that spreads to the rest of the community. My encounter made me feel so loved and everyone deserves the chance to have that experience.” 

If the remaining seniors are able to experience their encounter, certain things may be restricted due to Covid-19, such as hugging or sitting in close proximity. 

“I don’t feel like the encounter would be the same because we would have to social distance and not be able to hug and bond,” senior Roxana Abtin said. “I also think that a lot of people might feel uncomfortable hugging because of the social distancing we’ve had to do the past 6 months. In my perspective, sometimes hugging feels weird and different than it did before Covid-19 began.” 

Mr. Don Clarke, head of campus ministry and Jesuit retreats, was asked what restrictions would be set in place if the Corona Virus was still relatively prevalent. 

“When an Encounter is announced, it will be accompanied by a set of safety and hygienic restrictions that will be enforced. Anyone going on an Encounter this year will probably tell you that they knew what the expectations are for their weekend in light of Covid 19 guidelines.”

Current juniors are yet to experience their encounters, which would have been scheduled for this year. Seniors and juniors may possibly have to experience their encounters together due to timeliness. 

“Trust is a necessary part of the small group discussions and I think that already having gone on previous retreats with our senior classmates has built the foundation of trust that is required and that wouldn’t be the same with a small group mixed with juniors,” O’Connor said. “Also, our class has lost a lot of time together because of Covid-19 so I think that having the encounter experience and the chance to create new relationships and strengthen existing ones with our own classmates is super important.”

These concerns have also been brought to the attention of campus ministry.

“It is important to me to listen to what seniors are asking and each time I have met with them, they have asked that they be in a small group with just seniors. We will do everything we can to make that happen but it is in no way guaranteed,” Mr. Don Clarke said. 

Mr. Clarke has been working relentlessly to provide an encounter for the 75 seniors.   

“We have been working with St. Benedict Lodge this summer and following the state guidelines as well as the CDC guidelines to see how we can get students to the retreat site and back and safely let them attend an Encounter.” Mr. Clarke said. “We have changed the schedule to eliminate the events where social distancing could not be kept and we have developed a two day Encounter. Once we get an OK, we will set up a schedule for this year.” 

Alongside 75 seniors who have not experienced their junior encounter, the entire junior class is patiently waiting as well. 

“Depending on class size, we have had Encounters of up to 55 juniors. This year we are proposing Encounters of 32 juniors,” Mr. Clarke said. 

About the Writer
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Lucy Menendez, Staff Writer

Lucy Menendez is a senior at Jesuit High School and first time journalism student. Lucy plays basketball at Jesuit and is involved in multiple clubs. Her...

Open House With a Closed Campus

2020+Jesuit+Portland+Virtual+Open+House+Poster

Jesuit High School

2020 Jesuit Portland Virtual Open House Poster

Jesuit High School will host its first-ever virtual Open House Sunday, October 11. The event will last from 1 to 4 p.m. and take place using a Zoom webinar. Click here to register.

Open House is usually the day with the most energy present on campus, as the Jesuit community welcomes prospective students and families. Because large gatherings are banned due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Jesuit is challenged to utilize that same energy in a virtual environment. 

Open House attendees will first hear from Director of Admissions Erin DeKlotz, President Tom Arndorfer, and Principal Paul Hogan. They will segway into student experiences about the five elements of the profile of a Jesuit graduate.

Future students and families will also have the option to participate in a number of live panels. These panels will feature current students, parents, teachers, and coaches that represent many sports, clubs, and academic departments at Jesuit. There will also be a Q&A panel with students, parents, and teachers available for any general questions.

Although Open House will look different this year, Jesuit still endeavors to provide a welcoming yet informative experience for prospective students and families.

About the Contributor
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Reet Chatterjee, Staff Writer

A senior at Jesuit High School, Reet Chatterjee strives to better humanity with his writing. His writing focuses include social justice, politics, reform,...

COVID-19 cancels and postpones Spring at Jesuit

Graduation+is+postponed+due+to+the+coronavirus+with+uncertainity+on+what+will+happen+in+the+future+to+celebrate+the+graduates.

Graduation is postponed due to the coronavirus with uncertainity on what will happen in the future to celebrate the graduates.

Spring at Jesuit is usually filled with activities and events, but due to COVID-19, all in-person events have been cancelled or postponed. 

Some of the most important events of the school year are now in question, including Graduation, while Prom is already cancelled. 

“The biggest event that we needed to cancel was prom,” ASB teacher Dr. Exley said. “Students were pretty upset that their prom was canceled, but seemed to understand the canceling of the event based on us not having school and a need to practice social distancing. We are working on different events and activities for graduation weekend along with administration as a way to celebrate the class of 2020. We also will continue with weekly challenges to get students engaged and involved.”

Many seniors do not know what the future will hold to celebrate them, but Principal Hogan hopes to stay optimistic with students and families about an in-person graduation. 

“On May 1, we hosted the first-ever Twilight Parade/college-decision day celebration,” Mr. Hogan said. “We will be hosting a series of events on May 29-31.We are getting ready to announce that we HOPE to hold an in-person Commencement on Cronin Field on July 11. Not fully confirmed yet. If we are allowed to do that by the Governor, we will likely also have a Baccalaureate of some kind (maybe livestreamed) that morning.”

Although Principal Hogan hopes for a July 11th date for a commencement celebration, Governor Kate Brown has extended large gatherings of more than 25 people through September. 

This could all change if the state progresses to a vaccine or a reliable treatment for COVID-19 earlier than September, according to Governor Kate Brown. 

As for now though, it looks like until a further push for treatments and vaccines come to Oregon, big gatherings in the summer will be restricted. 

Junior Mackenzie Convey will be missing her first prom, and reflects on how she was feeling when she heard the news. 

“I was very upset and sad, because I thought in the beginning of quarantine that there still could have been a prom and we could go back to school,” Convey said. “Now I’m still sad, but I know I’ll still have a senior prom and that this is not my last dance.”

With uncertainty for the future, the student government class is doing its best to  connect Jesuit while in quarantine. 

“We have been trying to keep the Jesuit Community active through our instagram account and keeping the Jesuit Community informed of different activities that are happening even though we are not at school,” Dr. Exley. Said. “During the first week of Digital Learning, we started posting two challenges a week on the Jesuit instagram. We also created the Jesuit Senior instagram where Seniors can post about their plans for next year and created cards to be sent to teachers thanking them for their work during Teacher Appreciation Week on behalf of the Jesuit Student Body.”

Junior Damon Grim was in student government this year and was recently elected in the ASB cabinet for his senior year. He has been participating in the student government Zoom classes and helping to plan future events.

Once things are lifted, you will see many more things being planned to celebrate the seniors and juniors,” Grim said. 

Student government’s main goal, while school remains cancelled, is to connect the Jesuit community and remind Jesuit students of the strong community.

“Right now, our main ‘project’ or focus has been on the Jesuit Community and trying to remind students that we are all in this together,” Dr. Exley said. “We have also begun to discuss different service opportunities that we can do to help the larger community as we all deal with Covid-19. [I want] student government to be a place that helps remind Jesuit Students of our strong community and our many different connections to each other.”

Also as most student’s events and activities continue to be either postponed or cancelled, Principal Hogan shares how students are helping people struggling due to COVID-19 and the importance of volunteering. 

“We had a sandwich drive for Blanchet House and Storm McGraw and our Drama Dept have been making masks and gowns,” Mr. Hogan said. “Students like Manavi Thakur have created their own service/fundraising drives.” 

About the Writer
Photo of Annie Landgraf
Annie Landgraf, Alumni 2019-2020






Annie Landgraf is a managing editor for journalism. She was born in Lake Oswego, Oregon and went to Lake Oswego schools her whole life before...

Tutoring program connects students during quarantine

Tutoring+program+connects+students+during+quarantine

Junior Brian Xu founded “Students Tutor Students,” a free, online tutoring service to high school students in the Portland area. 

The service matches up student tutors and tutees based on subject and availability. Currently, the program is in the development stage, as Xu is compiling a list of student tutors/tutees who would work well together. 

“Interested tutors and people who are being tutored can sign up to help through a form that we have created. Overall, it’s an opportunity for people across the city to connect and educate each other in the midst of this crisis,” Xu said. 

Xu, along with junior Devansh Khunteta, are working to create a website for the program, as well as social media platforms. 

“Our long term future plans are lofty, but we believe that they’ll be achievable. We envision phasing the service onto an app so that people can create tutor and tutee accounts and be matched through the app, kind of like tinder, but for tutoring,” Xu said. “It will really help make it easier for a lot of people to have everything ready and accessible in the palm of their hand.”

Khunteta is  the technical director for Students Tutor Students, in charge of creating the forms for both tutors and tutees, as well as creating and maintaining the website. 

“Although at Jesuit we are given the resources to have programs such as NHS, not all students at other schools are given this same opportunity to have face to face interaction with tutors and teachers through mediums like Zoom,” Khunteta said. “However, by implementing a program such as Students Tutor Students, students from all different schools will be able to work together to grow academically. As a healthy byproduct, this program will also give students the opportunity to meet new people that they otherwise may not have met during quarantine.”

Khunteta and Xu both founded the chapter of “Junior State of America” at Jesuit, indicating their interest and involvement in politics. Through these experiences and focus on politics, Xu has grown to “naturally gain an awareness” on global issues, as well as issues in the Jesuit community. 

“When this crisis hit, and schooling turned online, my mind was on those who would be most adversely affected,” Xu said. “Teachers would be overwhelmed quickly as they become less accessible than before without face to face contact, and getting personal help in school for a lot of students would become even more difficult than it already is. After surveying my friends and seeing that many were like me and wanted to help out during these difficult times, I realized that this was a perfect opportunity for those students who want to get involved in their communities to help their peers through online tutoring.”

With Xu’s personal prior experience in tutoring, as well as organizational skills and passion for politics, Xu created a way to grow one-on-one interactions, such as tutoring, to a larger-scale movement, striving to help students across Portland maintain connections and an adequate education. 

“One of my biggest beliefs is that education is a great equalizer: that if everyone has access to adequate education, then everyone will have the power to take their lives into their own hands and achieve what they want to achieve,” Xu said. “The importance of education is undeniable in my eyes.”

About the Writer
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Scout Jacobs, Associate Editor-in-Chief







Scout Jacobs is a managing editor for the Jesuit Chronicles at Jesuit High School. As a senior in high school, this is her third year doing...

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